Patient discussion about habit

!!! The questions and answers on this page are written by patients and are not reviewed by health professionals.

Q. Alcoholism becomes a habit in person?

How does alcoholism becomes a habit in person?
A1If you think about alcohol all the time and you need it to feel good then it's a problem. If it's just a rare but pleasant action then there is no big disaster.
It may be a problem if the alcohol being the cause of depending (physical or corporial it is not just the same!)
A2Doctors do not know the reasons why people become alcoholics. Some start out drinking a little bit and end up hooked on alcohol. A person might drink to forget problems or to calm nerves, but then they end up needing alcohol to feel normal. Once a person loses control over drinking, he or she needs help to stop drinking.

Q. I am trying my best to reduce my habit towards drugs.

I am trying my best to reduce my habit towards drugs. I got many advices to stay away from hard drugs. What's the difference between 'hard' and 'soft' drugs?
A1No difference
A2I appreciate your effort to over come your habit. Let me come to the point. There's no difference. These are just old slang phrases from years back which were used to make a distinction between drugs that were seen to be very dangerous - like heroin - and those then seen as less dangerous - like cannabis. Such distinctions are pretty meaningless. Don't believe me? Well, think of alcohol. Alcohol is a drug that contributes towards the illness, injury or death of many tens of thousands of people each year in the UK. It's involved in most cases of domestic violence; it's a major cause of accidents at work; it's responsible for much of the violence on our streets - and senseless injury and death on our roads.
A3Agree with mrfoot! If you have made your decision to stay away from drugs, keep going on it! you're on the right track, friend!

The evil part of drugs is that it ruins your body cells, and makes them addicted to drugs (because of its temporary-fake-sensation). The only thing you should do to stop it is by staying FAR FAR AWAY from drugs, and not only from drugs, but also from the drugs community. because even the strongest man can fail because of peer-pressure.

Q. is red meat bad for you??? and what about white meat like pork??? why is consider to be healthy eating vegie

what are the advantages of this kind of diet ?
AEating a lot of red meat is considered to be a risk factor for developing colon cancer, and therefore it is advised not to eat too much of it. On the other hand, a diet rich with vegetables and fruit is considered very good because of the high fiber content, which is very benefitial for your gastrointestinal system. A diet poor with high fiber products is also considered a risk factor for the developement of colon cancer. White meat has a high content of fat and cholesterol, and is also not very recommended to be eating a lot of.

Q. How to get my motivation back?

Hi, I’m 22 years old girl, and since high school I’m 132 pounds stretched over 5’2’’. About two years ago, when I started college I gained another 20 pounds, that made me understand I’m overweight, and then I started a diet – mainly thinking before I eat something. I already lost those extra pounds, an I wish to lose another 10 pounds, but I feel I lost my motivation to restrict myself. Suddenly I find myself eating way too much, which makes me down, which makes me eat again… Any advice?
A1If you feel a craving for food, you can try to go to sleep – it helps me.
Good luck!
A2You can keep an eating diary – it’ll motivate you (many times we judge ourselves too severely) and will help you recognize problematic times (e.g. when you’re tired from work, before your period etc.). There is an example here: http://web4health.info/en/images/food-diary-en.pdf
A3First of all, well done for the first 20 pounds – you’re on the right track. Maintaining regular meals schedule may help you to control what you eat. If you feel hungry for something sweet, try first tea or a fruit before you turn to the chocolate snacks. There are many other tips here:
http://www.glamour.com/health/articles/2007/09/secretthings

Q. Lot’s of time at home, too close to the fridge - any tips?

I’m starting my 6 months-preparation period for my finals next month, which mean I’ll spend practically all day at home, in a dangerous vicinity to the fridge. I already lost 25 pounds that I rather not gain again. Does any one have any tips how to avoid the dangers of being at home so much? ?
A1If you are used to eat something when studying (like me…), try to move to healthier options – vegetables instead of snacks, water instead of coke etc. – it can save you a lot of calories. Good luck!
A2Tough times, indeed. Although the ‘dangerous vicinity to the fridge’ there are ways- try to prepare healthier food (if you have the time), set a regular meals schedule, set rules about taking snacks etc. If you feel the urge for a sweet thing, try to drink water (or tea) before you turn to the snacks.
A3You can make yourself a menu of what you will eat for the day (or you can go by the week). Once you have this you should be ok because you will already know what you are going to eat for the day. If you stick to it you shouldn't have any problems. Good luck on your finals. Hope this helps.

Q. Too many weddings with too many fatty food – any advice?

In the last few months I’ve been on a moderate diet, and already lost 10 pounds, but now I’m facing a threat – a series of weddings, all of them with lots of fatty food and cakes tempting me to “just taste them”… Any advice how to avoid these calorie-rich pitfalls? :-)
A1Try to pick the low-calorie food – a wedding doesn’t have to mean you must eat unhealthy food. For example drink water, eat salad etc.
A2You can try to skip the parts with the fatty-but-not-satiating parts to avoid eating cakes etc.
A3What I usually do when I go to a party (for instance a wedding), is eat whatever I want- only small portions of it. Try to eat the basic meal of the event (meat, etc.) and avoid the rest of the appetizers. As for deserts- I would take few small bites and not finish the entire dish. This way you don't feel guilty for enjoying the good food.

Q. Eating too much during stressful time

My sister in-law is currently at home at a terminal state, so now I have to look after my brother’s family, and I cook for us. Although I make good and satiating meals, I still find my self eating sweets every evening, probably to distract myself from the sight of my dying friend. I know it sounds inappropriate to think about it when my sister in-law is dying, but I’m afraid I’ll gain weight (I’m have couple of extra pounds already). What should I do?
A1Sometimes our hunger isn’t physical but emotional- we eat to avoid dealing with our feelings. It’s natural and many people act this way. Maybe you can talk to someone about your feelings, and when you’ll feel better about them, you’ll feel less urge to run away by eating.
A2First of all, my sincere consolations. It’s totally OK to think about yourself, even in a time like this. You don’t need to feel guilty for these feelings, and maybe these guilt feelings are what makes you eat more. You’re a wonderful person- not a cynical egoist. Don’t be harsh on yourself too much.
Take care!
A3It sounds like there's a bit more than just eating more lately because you are cooking and at home more. Maybe this stressful event in your family and the difficult emotional state you must be in, is causing you to be in a more depressed or stressed mood, and eating sweets is your escape. I think you should first realize that, and next you can decide you're stoping with the compensation eating habbit. Try and find something else to do to distract you, like watching T.V or listening to music, taking a walk outside, etc. If you feel hungry eat proper meals and small healthy snacks in between. Eat what you cook with everyone else during meal time and not while you're cooking.. Hope you manage to handle it all at once.
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