Patient discussion about Gestational diabetes

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Q. What complications have you had with gestational diabetes?

I have just found out that I have gestational diabetes and I am over 37 weeks pregnant. It has gone undiagnosed and we have found out that I why my baby is so large. She is already 8 pounds 12 ounces based on the ultra sound. My concerns are now with my baby and I want her to be healthy. Any personal experiences would be great!
A1Thanks for the help..
A2About complications, all you have to do is read this:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/gestational-diabetes/DS00316/DSECTION=complications
A3I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes with my first pregnancy. The only real difficulty was a very long labor due to a large baby. A large baby is probably all you will have to deal with. If the baby is too large you may end up with a C-section so prepare for that. Don't worry, you will probably both be fine.

Q. What is Gestational Diabetes?

What is Gestational Diabetes?
A1Gestational diabetes is a condition where you have high blood glucose (sugar) levels and it happens for the first timing during your pregnancy. About 7% of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes.
A2Here is a movie that explains it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUul9Iz6hhA

Q. How do I prevent Gestational diabetes?

The first pregnancy I developed Gestational diabetes at the 26 week. How do I prevent it from happening?
A1There are no guarantees when it comes to preventing gestational diabetes — but the more healthy habits you can adopt before pregnancy, the better. Because the risk factors are the same as diabetes type 2 – the same measures should be taken- Eat healthy foods, Get more physical activity, Lose excess pounds.
A2Gestational diabetes usually happens to women who have the tendency to develop diabetes type 2. their pancreas manufacture enough insulin on the every day life but do so in a sort of an effort. But when they are pregnant and the fetus is big enough it secrete hormones that causes the cells to be resistant to insulin. the pancreas cannot keep up and the gestation diabetes start.
A3Thanks Violet79, i'll do that (i'm not a very good swimmer though so i think i'll stick to walking)

Q. What is the cause of gestational diabetes?

If I’m healthy- how come I get diabetes while pregnant? and if it’s normal how come not everyone gets it?
A1Here is an elaborated site about that subject:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/gestational-diabetes/DS00316/DSECTION=causes
and here is a 30 min video about it:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1VCWoS6BGU
A2Gestational diabetes usually happens to women who have the tendency to develop diabetes type 2. their pancreas manufacture enough insulin on the every day life but do so in a sort of an effort. But when they are pregnant and the fetus is big enough it secrete hormones that causes the cells to be resistant to insulin. the pancreas cannot keep up and the gestation diabetes start.

Q. What does the term ‘gestational’ diabetes mean?

Hi, I was wondering what does having gestational diabetes mean because I have heard some friend of mine might have it.
A1Gestational diabetes is the term for diabetes that is discovered during pregnancy, and is triggered by it. Even though it may be transient, untreated gestational diabetes can damage the health of the fetus or mother. It affects about 1 in 50 pregnancies and is nowadays often diagnosed and treated early, thanks to the screening methods (glucose challenge tests) women undertake during their pregnancies.
A2Gestational diabetes is diabetes that develops during in the mother during a pregnancy. It resembles type 2 diabetes in several respects, involving a combination of relatively inadequate insulin secretion and responsiveness. It occurs in about 2%–5% of all pregnancies and may improve or disappear after delivery. Gestational diabetes is fully treatable but requires careful medical supervision throughout the pregnancy. About 20%–50% of affected women develop type 2 diabetes later in life.

Q. How soon can gestational diabetes be detected in pregnancy?

I am barely 6 weeks pregnant and had a blood glucose test done last week, the results came back high at 220. Does anyone know if that is too early for gestational diabetes, or do you think I had diabetes before the pregnancy and just didn't know about it?
A1They don’t usually test before the 24 week for gestational diabetes. So I guess that they had a reason to do so with you. So I would ask them if they see any other problem or what’s their reason.
A2I would say that you already had it, my daughter is 25 weeks 3 days and they are testing her for that next month. They said that gestational diabetes starts around 28 weeks.
Diabetes and pregnancy together are rough so please be careful.
Congrats on the little one.

Q. Can gestational diabetes really be diagnosed without the 3 hour test?

My doctor's office only did the one hour test and said I have gestational diabetes. Since I've been testing myself for a couple of days (four times a day) my average is in the 90's. Do you think it was really fair to diagnose me without giving me the 3 hour test and what can I do about it? I don't think I have it but they seem to think that one test is enough.
A1It can be diagnosed with only one test, but that result has to be quite high. Considering that diagnosis can prevent you from getting life insurance, I would insist that the doctor do a proper test or move to a different doctor.
A2I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes with my first pregnancy. The only real difficulty was a very long labor due to a large baby. A large baby is probably all you will have to deal with. If the baby is too large you may end up with a C-section so prepare for that. Don't worry, you will probably both be fine.
A3this is called "Screening glucose challenge test". and self glucose testing. you can diagnose by them. but 90 doesn't sound too much...it's not low but it's not so high too.
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