Patient discussion about deficit

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Q. haemoglobin deficiency

Haemoglobin deficiency - 6.3 rbc count less than normal range. platelets are 157000
A1what you describe here is pretty harsh numbers. very very low hemoglobin, low platelets level...have you checked for white blood cells? i recommend seeing a Dr. ASAP. with these numbers there is a good chance that you'll bleed from places that are not supposed to bleed.
A2I had a simliar problem several years ago; my doctor put me on 3 weeks rest, and a diet rich in nutients: lots of dark green and bright orange & yellow veggies, plus beets, fresh fruits, almonds, peanuts and peanut butter, dries figs, raisens, apricots, walnuts, some dairy, not too much coffee, brown rice and other whole grains, dried beans, lots of water. he had me on a high dose of iron as well. I also ate poultry, eggs, fish and meat within reason. I stayed with it for a long time with excellent results. hope this is helpful to you...take care.

Q. Recently I came to know after a test that I am vitamin D deficient so how much vitamin D should I take?

I am 26 yrs old and I have fibromyalgia. Recently I came to know after a test that I am vitamin D deficient so how much vitamin D should I take?
A1what is a normal level of vitamin d for a 65 yr old woman?
A2Vitamin D is a must for good health. Even the children are taught about this in their schooling. When you eat too much Vitamin D, calcium is being absorbed at a very high rate. This will be just like when you take in too much calcium. One result of eating too much Vitamin D is kidney stones. As taking in too much vitamin D can cause the calcium levels in our blood to be quite high, it can result in changes in heart rhythm and kidney damage. However, do not fret. Usually, such levels can only be obtained if you take too much supplements or cod liver oil. Hence, it is recommended that you take vitamin D in moderation. You could also get lot of Vitamin D from sunlight at free of cost ?

Q. what can be done for spontaneous hypothermia? is there a deficiency of hormones or anything that can be taken

Ahypothermia can be caused by al sort of things. Some bacterial infections, poisoning, aciduria , hypothyroidism and more. Is this the only symptom? I’m sure there are some others. But I think this could be a good idea to check up with a Dr.

Q. Can regular exercise lead to vitamin deficiency?

I am regular with my exercises every day. I don’t like to miss on my exercise. But I do miss on my food. I always take a healthy and good diet. But I fear of my vitamins and energy getting drained due to exercise. Can regular exercise lead to vitamin deficiency?
A1Yes, as I know you supplement your diet with vitamin C. This is reduced when you exercise extensively. And its recovery helps in muscle formation. Excessive body heat and sweat loss during the exercise can reduce the blood plasma levels of vitamin C. Have balanced diet along with plenty of fruits and vegetables. Drink 8-10 glasses or more of water every day.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSaH5Sod18c&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vbSaH5Sod18c_diet_nutrition__best_absorb_vitamin_c_supplements?q=diet%20with%20&feature=player_embedded

A2vitamins no, but minerals yes. working out means sweating and drinking a lot of fluids. this can cause a mineral deficiency. any way, any exercise needs a good nutrition on the side. there is no way your body will be able to build itself without proper nutrition right? so try to avoid missing meals.

Q. what are the symptoms to look for a person suspected to be Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder?

A1i would go with WaylonRonaldo on this, but be careful not to "home diagnose" your child. it's a very dangerous thing to do. there has to be a process of differential diagnosis in order to avoid a mistaken diagnosis of ADHD. and that should do a specialist. a group of specialists in fact.
A2The symptom of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) falls in 3 categories: inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. During social interactions inattention will become visible where the person cannot pay attention to details and is careless, shifts frequently from one incomplete activity to another and will miss on daily routine. Hyperactivity varies with age like preschoolers are in more constant motion compare to higher age and they are restless. In Impulsivity they become impatient, cannot wait for ones turn and intrude in other work and mattes.

Q. What is the recommended intake for iron?

I had a blood test recently which detected I have iron deficiency. I wanted to know what is the recommended intake for iron and which foods are rich with iron?
A1Adult males need to consume about 8 mg of iron per day and females (not pregnant) need to consume about 18 mg of iron per day. There are two forms of dietary iron: heme and nonheme. Heme iron is derived from hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that delivers oxygen to cells. Heme iron is found in animal foods that originally contained hemoglobin, such as red meats, fish, and poultry. Iron in plant foods such as lentils and beans is arranged in a chemical structure called nonheme.
A2men needs 8 mg a day and women needs 18 mg a day.

here is a link with the iron rich foods, look at "Appendix B-3. Food Sources of Iron":
http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/AppendixB.htm#appB3

Q. i have pains in the lower abdominal areas what is the couse

these pain usually occar off and on besides the the abdomen in the lower areasand some times all over the abdomen
AIs the pain worsened when you cough or lift heavy weight? It may suggest hernia (protrusion of gut loop through the abdomen wall, see here http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/hernia.html ). However, it's virtually impossible to diagnose you through the net, so consulting a doctor would be wise.


Take care,
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