Patient discussion about agent

!!! The questions and answers on this page are written by patients and are not reviewed by health professionals.

Q. Has anyone had an allergic reaction to gadolinium dye, MRI contrast agents, I have had a severe reaction.

I would like to know the long term effects of this dye. And if anyone else has had or heard of problems and reactions to it. Please answer me. Thank you
A1In 1969 I almost died from the IVP dye. I had no idea I was allergic and when I awoke I was in a "recovery room." The doctor told me to always tell any physicians/paramedics etc of my allergy status regarding the dye. I now have chronic back pain, have a history of cancer in the family and the doctor wants to do a scan (including dye) but when I emphasized that I was allergic he backed off. Now I am wondering if there is anything else that can be done to test the bone (scan) without the dye. Any answers? Thanks
A2I had a terrible reaction to dye they call x-ray contrast, Blood pressure shot up, had respirtory distressed, vomiting, horrible red blothches. I was told I can take something a couple of days before I have to have if i ever need again but I hope to never have to b/c I am terrified of the thought! It was very scary for me and a pain block in my back turned into several hours at the hospital! It now lists x-ray contrast as one of my allergies. I am unsure of any long term affects. I was told it was safe BUT no one warned me about what could happen If I had was allergic either!
best,

Q. Can anyone suggest a treatment for plantar fasciitis, apart from ultrasound, physio, anti-inflammatory agents?

My friend has had Plantar Fasciitis for more than 1 year and has persevered with all the ususal treatments above plus lots of rest from weight-bearing and elevation.
APadded foot splints, silicone heels insert and special shoes (e.g. arch-supporting shoes) may also help. These are usually sold and fitted by a professional. Exercise is another important measure. Some patients benefit from avoiding walking barefoot or in sleepers but rather using shoes from the first step.

More advanced treatments include steroid-local anesthetics injections, botulinum toxin (similar to botox) injections and surgery.

The prognosis is usually favorable, and most patients achieve relief of the pain.

However, all of the above is just for general knowledge - if you have any specific question, you may want to consult a doctor.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007021.htm

This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.