zinc

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zinc

 [zingk]
a chemical element, atomic number 30, atomic weight 65.37, symbol Zn. (See Appendix 6.) It is a trace element in the diet, a component of several enzymes, including DNA and RNA polymerases and carbonic anhydrase. It is abundant in red meat, shellfish, liver, peas, lentils, beans, and rice. A well-balanced diet assures adequate intake of zinc. Those who may suffer from zinc deficiency include persons on a strictly vegetarian diet and those who are on a high-fiber diet. In the latter case, the zinc is bound to the fiber and is eliminated in the feces without having been absorbed through the intestinal wall. Poor absorption of zinc also can occur in persons with chronic and severe bowel disease. The recommended daily intake is 12–15 mg for an adult. A severe deficiency of zinc can retard growth in children, cause a low sperm count in adult males, and retard wound healing. Signs of a deficiency include anorexia and a diminished sense of taste. An excessive intake of zinc (usually in those who work with the metal or breathe its fumes) can either cause pneumoconiosis or interfere with the body's use of copper and other trace elements, producing diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and other signs of intestinal irritation.
zinc acetate a salt used as an astringent and styptic.
zinc chloride a salt used as a nutritional supplement in total parenteral nutrition and applied topically as an astringent and a desensitizer for dentin.
zinc oxide a topical astringent and skin protectant; also a sunscreen.
zinc stearate a powder of zinc in a compound with stearic and palmitic acids; used as a water-repellent skin protectant in dermatoses.
zinc sulfate a topical astringent for mucous membranes, especially those of the eye.
zinc undecylenate the zinc salt of undecylenic acid; it is a topical antifungal.

zinc (Zn),

(zingk),
A metallic element, atomic no. 30, atomic wt. 65.39; an essential bioelement; a number of salts of zinc are used in medicine; a cofactor in many proteins.
[Ger. Zink]

zinc

A metallic element (atomic number 30; atomic weight 65.39) which is an essential daily requirement. Zinc plays a key role in growth and development, and is required by more than 200 metalloenzymes, including DNA- and RNA-polymerases, carbonic anhydrase, carboxypeptidase, reverse transcriptase, as well as by zinc-finger proteins involved in gene expression. Zinc is stored in synaptic vesicles and is a synaptic neuromodulator, acting in the hippocampus to induce depolarising synaptic potentials. The recomended daily allowance (RDA) of zinc is 5–15 mg/day (normal range 70–120 µg/dL). 

Dietary source
Seafood, red meat  wheat germ, veal sesame seeds, pumpkin and squash seeds, chocolate and peanuts. ± 20% of dietary zinc is absorbed, the process of which is enhanced by protein-rich foods (animal proteins, brewer’s yeast, legumes, nuts, pumpkin seeds, seafood, whole grains); ±90% is excreted in faeces.
 
Toxicology
Zinc-laden fumes and dusts are generated in the manufacture of alloys, paints, synthetic rubbers and roofing materials.

zinc

(zingk)
A metallic element, atomic no. 30, atomic wt. 65.39; an essential bioelement; a number of salts of zinc are used in medicine; a cofactor in many proteins.
[Ger. Zink]

zinc

A metallic element required in small quantities for health. Deficiency is rare but may occur in people with certain MALABSORPTION conditions, with ANOREXIA NERVOSA, DIABETES, severe burns, prolonged feverish illness, severe malnutrition in childhood and in alcoholics. Zinc deficiency is associated with atrophy of the thymus gland and depressed cell-mediated immunity, skin atrophy, poor wound healing, loss of appetite, persistent diarrhoea, apathy and loss of hair. A normal diet contains plenty of zinc but a small zinc supplement is said to shorten the duration of the common cold.

zinc

(zingk)
A metallic element and essential bioelement; many salts are used in medicine; a cofactor in many proteins.
[Ger. Zink]

Patient discussion about zinc

Q. If an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe? Hi! While reading through the medical journal, I came to know that if an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe?

A. Approximately 30%–50% of alcoholics have low zinc status because ethanol consumption decreases intestinal absorption of zinc and increases urinary zinc -

excretion-http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16099027?dopt=Abstract

zinc is a necessary mineral you need for the immune system, brain function and other systems of the body.

Q. If an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe? Hi! While reading through the medical journal, I came to know that if an alcoholic consumes zinc, will he be safe?

A. I am glad that you are regularly updating the medical journals. Consumption of zinc is a safe and effective means of affording protection from alcohol induced tissue injury. Zinc deficiency is an underlying feature of alcohol abuse.

More discussions about zinc
References in periodicals archive ?
(Postscript: Two years later, he has remained cancer-free; he still takes sodium selenite and zinc gluconate as herein described.)
The presence of many hydroxyl radicals in zinc gluconate structure may contribute to biological activity and solubility of the compound.
Reduction in duration of common colds by zinc gluconate lozenges in a double-blind study.
UV Spectrum (taken by UV Spectrometer Model Labomed UVD 3500) of the iron gluconate shows the lmax at 239nm (Figure-3), while that of zinc gluconate was 229nm.
In the first study of zinc lozenges for common colds, published in 1984, (4) my colleagues and I showed that it was possible to shorten the duration of colds by 7 days when zinc gluconate tablets (dietary supplements sold over the counter) were slowly dissolved in the mouth every 2 wakeful hours.
Upon admission, systemic treatment was begun with 300 mg of rifampicin every 12 hours, 100 mg per day of zinc gluconate, and 50 mg per day of oral prednisolone with approximately 70% improvement of the inflammatory lesions and complete improvement of the suppuration.
What's in it: 13.3 milligrams of zinc gluconate per lozenge.
It also includes selected anti-bacterial ingredients such as piroctone olamine and zinc gluconate to promote the healing of blemishes.
(28.) McElroy BH, Miller SP An open-label, single-center, phase IV clinical study of the effectiveness of zinc gluconate glycine lozenges (Cold-Eeze) in reducing the duration and symptoms of the common cold in school-aged subjects.
The typical dosage for zinc gluconate lozenges is 9 to 24 milligrams of elemental zinc taken every two hours while awake and symptomatic.
A recent study comparing the bioavailability of zinc gluconate and zinc enriched yeast (Lalmin Zn) was recently conducted on human volunteers in Japan.
Lead researcher Ananda Prasad and her collaborators randomly assigned 50 healthy people ages 55 to 87 to receive either a daily supplement of zinc in the form of zinc gluconate providing 45 mg of elemental zinc per day, or a placebo.

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