Zeeman effect


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Related to Zeeman effect: Stark effect, Anomalous zeeman effect

Zee·man ef·fect

the splitting of spectral lines into three or more symmetrically placed lines when the light source is subjected to a magnetic field.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Zeeman,

Pieter, Dutch physicist and Nobel laureate, 1865-1943.
Zeeman effect - the splitting of spectral lines into three or more symmetrically placed lines when the light source is subjected to a magnetic field.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
As for the linearity of the Zeeman effect, it is ensured because either the weak field laws are valid and then Q/I and U/I, which are quadratic, are much smaller than V/I, which is linear so that the largest term has a linear behavior, or the weak field laws do not apply, which means that the magnetic field is strong even if it does not fill the whole space, and when the magnetic field is strong it manifests in the same linear manner in the four Stokes parameters, depending on the atomic sublevels magnetic splitting, which is linear.
Blood lead levels were analyzed by a Zeeman effect graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (PerkinElmer 5100 PC with AS 60 autosampler; PerkinElmer, Wellesley, MA, USA).
In the nineteen-eighties, researchers tested another way of using the Zeeman effect in AAS: intensity measurement at three different magnetic field strengths (3-field mode).
The C field used in NIST-F1 is about 0.1 [mu]T (1 mG) and causes a 5 X [10.sup.-14] fractional frequency shift due to the second-order Zeeman effect. This shift is evaluated by measuring the frequency of the \4,1>[right arrow]\3,1> magnetic-field-sensitive transition and using the frequency of that transition to correct for the shift in the \4,0>[right arrow]\3,0> transition.
Moreover, physical phenomena like the Hall effect(3) and the Zeeman effect would not occur without the intervention of a particular causal mechanism.
In 1908 he was able to show from the spectrum of sunspots that they exhibited the Zeeman effect (see 1896).
It is similar to what happens when an [Mn.sup.2+] ion acts on an exciton in a quantum dot with a so-called giant Zeeman effect [10-12].