Yuzpe regimen


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Yuzpe regimen

[Albert Yuzpe, contemporary Canadian obstetrician/gynecologist]
A type of emergency contraception (colloquially, a “morning after pill”) in which a patient takes estradiol and levonorgestrel within 72 hours after sexual intercourse to prevent pregnancy and implantation.

Yuzpe Regimen

A two-dose treatment with combined ECPs to prevent pregnancy after unprotected intercourse; the first dose is taken as soon as possible and the second dose is taken 12 hours after the first.
References in periodicals archive ?
(4.) Task force of postovulatory methods of fertility regulation, Randomized controlled trial of levonorgestrel versus the Yuzpe regimen of combined oral contraceptives for emergency contraception, Lancet, 1998, 352(9126):428-433.
The Yuzpe regimen has replaced the older postcoital therapy of high doses of the estrogen diethylstilbestrol, primarily because the Yuzpe regimen has fewer side effects.
Elstein, "Comparison of Yuzpe Regimen, Danazol and Mifepristone (RU486) in Oral Postcoital Contraception," British Medical Journal, 305:927-931, 1992.
In a much larger trial, 800 women were randomly assigned to use either mifepristone or the Yuzpe regimen. Although 23 pregnancies would have been expected in each group if none of the women had taken emergency oral contraceptives, there were only four pregnancies in the group receiving combined birth control pills and no pregnancies in the group receiving mifepristone.
The Yuzpe regimen of emergency contraception is reported to be 97% to 98% effective in preventing pregnancy [26].
Recent research has indicated that levonorgestrel pills can be effective for up to 5 days (120 hours) post-coitus, [21,22] which is the same time span afforded by the copper intrauterine device, while the Yuzpe regimen is effective for up to 72 hours.
The results imply that (1) if the Yuzpe regimen is completely inefficacious, then the levonorgestrel regimen has an efficacy of 49% and (2) for every additional 2 percentage points of efficacy of the Yuzpe regimen, 1 percentage point of efficacy is added to the levonorgestrel regimen.
An influential report on ABC News in 1994 focused on the Reproductive Health Technology Project's method: a project board member would "cut up packets of oral contraceptives and place the Yuzpe regimen dosage in an envelope along with typed instructions on how and when to use the pills for postcoital contraception."
In 1997, the Food and Drug Administration concluded that the Yuzpe regimen of emergency contraception (two doses of combined estrogen and progestin taken 12 hours apart) is safe and effective in preventing pregnancy within 72 hours of unprotected sex or contraceptive failure; subsequent studies confirmed its effectiveness for up to 120 hours after sex.
It was not until 1993 that a single study, conducted in Hong Kong, demonstrated that the use of levonorgestrel alone was as effective as the Yuzpe regimen in preventing pregnancy, with a reduced frequency of adverse events.
The Yuzpe regimen, or Preven, was the first emergency contraceptive approved by the FDA.