Young's experiment

experiment, Young's

Method of producing interference of light which was shown by Young in 1801. He used two coherent beams of light that were produced by passing light through a very small circular aperture in one screen, then through two small circular apertures very close together in a second screen. On a third screen, behind the second screen, there will be two overlapping sets of waves and, if the original source is emitting monochromatic light, interference fringes will appear on the third screen (Fig. E8). See coherent sources; interference fringes.
Fig. E8 Youngs experiment (S, source of light (illuminated pinhole); A and B, pinholes; F, circular interference fringes)enlarge picture
Fig. E8 Young's experiment (S, source of light (illuminated pinhole); A and B, pinholes; F, circular interference fringes)
References in periodicals archive ?
In a modern version of Young's experiment, monochromatic light is directed at two narrow slits that are parallel to each other and very close together.
In Young's experiment, light was made to pass through two narrow slits in an opaque barrier (wall) and collect on a photographic plate behind the barrier.
In other words, the two ions acted just like the pinholes of Young's experiment.

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