yin and yang

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Related to Yin deficiency: Yang deficiency

yin and yang

The opposite but complementary principles of Chinese philosophy incorporated into traditional Chinese medicine. Yin is feminine, dark and negative, Yang masculine, bright and positive. Their interaction and balance is believed to maintain the harmony of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the first update, the causal relationship is inferred: (Exterior, Yin Deficiency) [right arrow] Fire-Heat.
Gender Half-exterior half-interior Cold Fire-heat Gender Yin deficiency Yang deficiency Yang floating Dampness Gender Phlegm External wind Table 6: Data analysis.
Chen, "Study on the mechanism of denuded tongue coating due to yin deficiency," Chinese Journal of Modern Developments in Traditional Medicine, vol.
Yingshuai, The theory and comparative study between Yang deficiency, and Yin deficiency constitution on metabonomics [Ph.D.
According to "Classification and determination of TCM constitution" published by China Association of Chinese Medicine (CACM) in 2009, the TCM constitution can be classified into nine basic types: balanced, qi deficiency, yang deficiency, yin deficiency, phlegm-dampness, damp-heat, blood stasis, qi stagnation, and allergic constitution.
In the training dataset, 273 patients showed qi deficiency of spleen and kidney (QDSK), 66 were with both qi and yin (DBQY), 19 exhibited yang deficiency of spleen and kidney, 8 got yin deficiency of liver and kidney, 3 presented lower energizer damp-heat, and 1 had lung wind-heat.
Gan-shen Yin deficiency, one of the major subtypes of Yin deficiency, is very common in primary liver cancer (PLC), diabetes mellitus (DM), and high blood pressure (HBP) patients, which express emaciation, soreness and weakness of the lumbar region, night sweat, dizziness, syrigmus, and so on.
Gao, "Review of hypertension patients with Yin deficiency with yang hyperactivity," Journal of Anhui TCM College, vol.
The classification criteria of syndrome elements were (1) six-excess external contraction: wind, cold, dampness, dryness, and fire; (2) five endogenous qi: internal wind, internal cold, internal dampness, internal dryness, and internal fire; (3) factors related to gas: qi deficiency, qi stagnation, qi block, qi counterflow, qi fall, and qi collapse; (4) factors related to blood: blood deficiency, blood stasis, blood collapse, blood dryness, and bleeding; (5) factors related to yin and yang: yin deficiency, yang deficiency, yin exuberance, and yang hyperactivity; (6) others: poison, excessive fluid, and phlegm turbidity.
In China, each component is used in combination with the others to define the pattern, such as "liver yin deficiency pattern," and is not usually used independently.