yew

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yew

(yo͞o)
n.
1. Any of several poisonous evergreen coniferous trees or shrubs of the genus Taxus, having scarlet cup-shaped arils and flat needles that are dark green above and yellowish below. Yews contain compounds used in medicine and are often grown as ornamentals.
2. The wood of any of these trees, especially the durable, fine-grained wood of the Eurasian and North African species Taxus baccata, used in cabinetmaking and for archery bows.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Old photographs show the three yews were well established when the second - dedicated to St John - was built in 1885.
With the demise of the church and the closure of many redundant churches, these buildings and some lands, with or surrounded by yews, are being sold off.
The common yew, Taxus baccata, bears very small dark green leaves and in time reaches up to 2.4m tall.
According to the Woodland Trust Common yews can reach 400 to 600 years of age with 10 yew trees in Britain believed to predate the 10th century.
In a natural and balanced system, yews display several self-regeneration factors that compromise the reproduction of natural specimens (ISZKULO, 2010).
HIYA yews lot, here's me and our Wayne on our hols again an' we thought yewd like to see the piccies.
A total of 32,000 young English yews were planted on an area of 1,735 square metres near the John Dobson-designed mansion, and the couple invited pupils from all 142 of the county's first schools to help.
But we don't clip for the drugs we clip to keep the shape of yews as they are."
Stewart Cameron from Fredericton have fostered cultivation of the Eastern Yew and will bring their knowledge and expertise to the North, along with 12,000 Yews for research purposes.
These outstanding gardens have 100 yews which began life back in the 17th century, planted by John Fetherston, a barrister who owned the house at that time.
Twelve other yews were planted just below it and it came to represent the Sermon on the Mount.