Yersinia

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Yersinia

 [yer-sin´e-ah]
a genus of nonmotile, ovoid or rod-shaped, nonencapsulated, gram-negative bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae). Y. pes´tis causes plague in humans and rodents; it is transmitted from rat to rat and from rat to human by the rat flea, and between humans by the human body louse. Y. enterocoli´tica causes acute gastroenteritis and mesenteric lymphadenitis, especially in young children, and arthritis, septicemia, and erythema nodosum in adults. Y. pseudotuberculo´sis causes disease in rodents and mesenteric lymphadenitis in humans.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Yersinia

(yer-sin'ē-ă),
A genus of motile and nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative, unencapsulated, ovoid to rod-shaped cells; Yersinia are nonmotile at 37°C, but some species are motile at temperatures below 30°C; motile cells are peritrichous; citrate is not used as a sole source of carbon; these organisms are parasitic on humans and other animals; the type species is Yersinia pestis.
[A. J. E. Yersin, Swiss bacteriologist, 1862-1943]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

yersinia

(yər-sĭn′ē-ə)
n. pl. yersin·iae (-ē-ē′)
A gram-negative bacterium of the genus Yersinia that causes various diseases in animals and humans, including plague.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Yersinia

A genus of pathogenic gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, coccobacillary bacteria, which cause bubonic plague–Y pestis, intestinal infections–Y enterocolitica, mesenteric lymphadenitis–Y pseudotuberculosis, which mimics appendicitis
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Yer·sin·i·a

(yĕr-sin'ē-ă)
A genus of motile and nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria containing gram-negative, unencapsulated, ovoid to rod-shaped cells. These organisms are parasitic on humans and other animals. The type species is Yersinia pestis.
[A. J. E. Yersin, Swiss bacteriologist, 1862-1943]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Yersinia

A genus of GRAM NEGATIVE rod-shaped organisms that includes the bacillus Y. pestis responsible for PLAGUE. Formerly classified as Pasteurella , Yersinia have been reclassified as Enterobacteriaceae and the genus renamed. Louis Pasteur, although nominal head of the Institute, was not entitled to the credit or the discovery of the plague bacillus. (Alexandre Émile Jean Yersin, 1862–1943, French bacteriologist, working in Hong Kong.)
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Yer·sin·i·a

(yĕr-sin'ē-ă)
Genus of motile and nonmotile, non-spore-forming bacteria containing gram-negative, unencapsulated, ovoid to rod-shaped cells; parasitic on humans and other animals; type species is Y. pestis.
[A. J. E. Yersin, Swiss bacteriologist, 1862-1943]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Diagnosis of Yersinia infections is difficult without specific culture, Yersinia is not routinely tested for in the United States, and isolation of the organism by culture may be difficult with standard media (2,10).
The reported incidence of Campylobacter, Cryptosporidium, Listeria, Salmonella, Shigella, STEC O157, and Yersinia infections remains highest among children aged <4 years.
The estimated incidence of Campylobacter, Listeria, Salmonella, Shigella, STEC O157, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections (Figure 1) did not change significantly in 2007 compared with 2004-2006, but the estimated incidence of Cryptosporidium infections increased 44% (CI = 8%91%).
Editorial Note: In 2006, compared with the 1996-1998 baseline period, significant declines occurred in the estimated incidence of Campylobacter, Listeria, Shigella, and Yersinia infections. However, most of these declines occurred before 2006.
Plague and other Yersinia infections. In: Kasper DL, Braunwald E, Fauci AS, et al, eds.
During 1996-2001, the estimated incidence of Yersinia infections decreased 49% (95% confidence interval [CI]=35% to 60% decrease), Listeria decreased 35% (95% CI=9% to 53% decrease), Campylobacter decreased 27% (95% CI=19% to 35% decrease), and Salmonella decreased 15% (95% CI=7% to 22% decrease).
Listeria, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio, and Yersinia infections in Minnesota and Oregon and in selected counties in California, Connecticut, and Georgia.