SFN

(redirected from YWHAS)

SFN

A gene on chromosome 8q23.1 that encodes an adapter protein which regulates a broad spectrum of general and specialised signalling pathways by binding to a large number of partners, usually by recognising a phosphoserine or phosphothreonine motif. When bound to KRT17, stratifin regulates protein synthesis and epithelial cell growth by stimulating the AKT/MTOR pathway. It is a p53-regulated inhibitor of G2/M progression.
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Linda Borish astutely analyzes Jewish women's involvement in sport, previously almost entirely overlooked, despite extensive participation through settlement houses, YWHAs, and Jewish country clubs.
At other times, Jewish young women and girls might seek to participate in sporting activities to participate in broader cultural trends in America; some females desired to exert their autonomy as participants in sports under the auspices of YWHAs.
A woman riding on a bicycle, when dressed properly, is neither immodest nor unwomanly." He concluded, "The intemperate attack upon the sport by the League will certainly effect nothing."(21) Heeding Rabbi Wise's assessment of bicycling, Jewish females apparently participated in the bicycle craze, as evidenced in some YWHAs publicizing the sport.
In fact, most YWHAs in the early twentieth century existed as Ladies Auxiliaries to YMHAs to assist immigrant and working-class women and girls.
The JWB became the national governing body for YMHAs and YWHAs, and the National Council of Young Men's Hebrew and Kindred Associations.
Some YWHAs survived for only a few years, but made it a point to offer physical training to Jewish women and girls.
Some YWHAs initially affiliated with YMHAs desired to secure a separate organization from the men's to pursue a full agenda of activities for female members.
The Young Women's Hebrew Association (YWHA) likewise first appeared in New York City, again modeled after its Christian counterpart, the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA).
YMHA men formed a second female auxiliary, the Young Women's Hebrew Association (YWHA), that May.
Others hoped to emulate the New York YWHA, which in 1914 built an impressive eight-story building with synagogue, gymnasium, classrooms, and accommodations for 150 young women.
In February 1916 YWHA girls went to Sisterhood for help in gaining independence from the men.
Not surprisingly, Brenner saw Sisterhood's influence over the YWHA as a serious threat.