Acetobacter

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Acetobacter

/Ace·to·bac·ter/ (ah-se″to-bak´ter) a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (family Acetobacteraceae), made up of nonsporogenous organisms that produce acetic acid from ethanol and found in fruits, vegetables, souring juices, and alcoholic beverages.

Acetobacter

A genus of rod-shaped, flagellated or nonmotile bacteria that oxidise ethanol to acetic acid.
Habitat Acetobacter spp are found on fruits and vegetables, and in souring juices. There are no reports in the literature suggesting that Acetobacter aceti is pathogenic in humans or animals. While Acetobacter spp are used commercially to produce vinegar, and to acidify some ales, they can destroy fermenting wine.

Acetobacter

(ă-sēt″ō-bak′tĕr) [L. acetum, vinegar, + Gr. bakterion, little rod]
A genus of gram-negative bacilli that produce vinegar from plant matter.
References in periodicals archive ?
xylinum or other bacteria engineered with those genes to make commercial amounts of nanocellulose.
xylinum nanocellulose genes into Nobles' blue-green algae.
xylinum y Sarcina ventriculi, la celulosa confiere proteccion mecanica, quimica y biologica dentro del habitat natural.
Por otra parte, se han aislado y caracterizado cepas altamente productoras en cultivo agitado, tales como Acetobacter xylinum BCR5 [29], Acetobacter xylinum subsp.
3 Efecto de las condiciones de cultivo sobre la produccion de celulosa bacteriana Schramm y Hestrim (1954), realizaron uno de los primeros trabajos sobre produccion de celulosa bacteriana, empleando Acetobacter xylinum en cultivo estatico [28].
Structural characterization of the Acetobacter xylinum endo-beta-1,4-glucanase CMCax required for cellulose biosynthesis.
Partial bioenergetic characterization of Gluconacetobacter xylinum cells released from cellulose pellicles by a novel methodology.
Effect of various carbon and nitrogen sources on cellulose synthesis by Acetobacter xylinum.
In the most common process, glucose is treated with hydrogen at high pressure to convert it to sorbitol, which is then fermented with the bacteria Acetobacter xylinum to yield sorbose.
Produced by a bacterium known as Acetobacter xylinum, the cellulose is strong enough to cope with blood pressure and works well with the body's own tissue.