xenotransplantation

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Related to Xenotransplants: xenograft, xenotransplantation

xenotransplantation

(zĕn′ə-trăns′plăn-tā′shən, zē′nə-)
n.
The surgical transfer of cells, tissues, or especially whole organs from an organism of one species to an organism of a different species.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
The transplantation of an organ from a lower mammal—e.g., baboon, pig—to a higher mammal—e.g., human
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

xenotransplantation

Xenogeneic transplantation Transplant biology The transplantation of cells or tissues from one species to another; the use of live, nonhuman animal cells, tissues, and organs in humans. See Xenograft.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

xenotransplantation

Transplantation of organs from animals, usually transgenic animals, especially pigs, specifically engineered for the purpose. Until recently, no transplanted pig organ had survived for more than a month. But advances in the development of new immunosuppressive agents against xenografts and the identification of the main target for human xenoreactive (anti-pig) antibodies have extended this period to an average of 76 days. Precautions can also be taken against virus transmission. The future for xenotransplantation seems bright.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
KEY WORDS: animal model, fetal testis, human, mouse, multinucleated germ cells, phthalate, rat, seminiferous cords, testicular dysgenesis, xenotransplant. Environ Health Perspect 120:1137-1143 (2012).
However, there are limits to the utilitarian argument for xenotransplants. Even if they were widely available, the treatment would be immensely expensive.
seem more directed at xenotransplants than chimeras, although the line
The cases deal with genetically modified foods, sport hunting, and xenotransplants of animal organs.
He ends his survey with a look into the future and concludes that that future is bright because of scientific advances in xenotransplants, genetic research and improvements in immuno-suppressants: 'Novel scientific advances ...
Most experts say those "answers" are at least 5 (xenotransplants if they work) to 20 years (all the other therapies) away.
In Part II of this paper, we set out the potential health benefits for recipients of xenotransplants, along with the associated risks to recipients and the wider population, addressing both scientific and ethical concerns.
Presented only in Italian at a Vatican news conference, the 11,000-word document was the fruit of a Vatican working group made up of 23 church ethicists and international experts in animal organ transplants, known as xenotransplants. The text offers a technical overview of the state of xenotransplant research, which is still in early stages, and a detailed analysis of potential ethical issues.
Under Food and Drug Administration rules, such transplants with existing cells would be classified as "xenotransplants," or transplants of animal tissue, and would be subject to strict requirements for both researchers and patients.
The FDA regulates all clinical use of xenotransplants in the U.S.
Referring to his exhibits as "anatomical artworks," von Hagens updates Fragonard for the age of xenotransplants and genetic chimera.