xenogenesis

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xenogenesis

 [zen″o-jen´ĕ-sis]
2. production of offspring unlike either parent.

xenogenesis

(zĕn′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs, zē′nə-)
n.
The supposed production of offspring markedly different from either parent.

xen′o·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk), xen′o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the cyborg and the miscegenate text, the posthuman body 'refuses fixity, definition, (and) boundaries' according to Naomi Jacobs, who interprets the Xenogenesis trilogy as 'a series of perspectives on posthumanity', that is, participating in 'the postmodern critique of the humanist subject: the critique of the individual as a rationally self-determining, self-defining being, and of individual identity as the source of agency'.
Like Zaki, Michaels takes the Xenogenesis trilogy as an opportunity to comment on 'the essentialist/ antiessentialist debate', but, unlike Zaki and other participants in that debate, he sees the two positions as more similar than different, because they both have an investment in 'maintaining difference'; whether the status of that difference is physiological or cultural, essential or constructed, is of secondary importance.
(30) Amanda Boulter, 'Polymorphous Futures: Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy', in American Bodies: Cultural Histories of the Physique, ed.
Thomas Foster's "'We Get to Live, and So Do They': Octavia Butler's Contact Zones" is similarly noteworthy, offering sustained critical attention both to the Xenogenesis trilogy and to the short story "Amnesty." About the story, he argues that "'Amnesty' makes more explicit Butler's double-sided dialogue with both science fiction and African American traditions" (149) and "restores a dimension of complexity" to the Xenogenesis trilogy in its refusal of easy answers regarding reciprocity versus exploitation in human/alien encounters (162).
"Contemplating and Contesting Violence in Dystopia: Violence in Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy." Contemporary Justice Review 9.1 (Mar.
"The High Cost of Cyborg Survival: Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy." Foundation 72 (Spring 1998): 49-57.
"'Embracing Otherness': An Examination of Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy." Kimota 5 (Winter 1996): 45-49.
Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy." American Bodies: Cultural Histories of the Physique.
In the Xenogenesis trilogy, the Oankali literally consume genetic material, reading it as books (41), but also at the same time seeing it as an essential food.
"The High Costs of Cyborg Survival: Octavia Butler's Xenogenesis Trilogy." Foundation 72 (Spring 1988): 49-57.
Eva Federmayer's essay, "Octavia Butler's Maternal Cyborgs: The Black Female World of the Xenogenesis Trilogy" (ch.