xanthine

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xanthine

 [zan´thēn]
a purine compound found in most bodily tissues and fluids; it is a precursor of uric acid. Methylated xanthine compounds such as caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline are used for their bronchodilator effects.

xan·thine (Xan),

(zan'thēn),
Oxidation product of guanine and hypoxanthine, precursor of uric acid; occurs in many organs and in the urine, occasionally forming urinary calculi; elevated in molybdenum cofactor deficiency and in xanthinuria.

xanthine

(zăn′thēn′, -thĭn)
n.
1. A yellowish-white, crystalline purine base, C5H4N4O2, that is a precursor of uric acid and is found in blood, urine, muscle tissue, and certain plants.
2. Any of several derivatives of this compound.

xan·thine

(zan'thēn)
Oxidation product of guanine and hypoxanthine, precursor of uric acid; occurs in many organs and in the urine, occasionally forming urinary calculi.
References in periodicals archive ?
Xanthines are another solution in the fight to relieve pulmonary airflow disorders.
Theophylline is related chemically to the natural metabolite xanthine. Other xanthenes are caffeine and theobromine.
The xanthine group has a number of general physiological effects in humans, including central nervous system stimulation, Cardiac muscle stimulation, diuresis, bronchial, uterine, and vascular smooth muscle relaxation, peripheral and coronary vasodilation, and cerebral vasoconstriction.
Chemically, each table contains the active ingredient, Pentoxy-fylline De-Methyl - Xanthine, which is first cousin to caffeine, which is chemically Tri-Methyl Xanthine.
Xanthine is a chemical structure consisting of two adjacent rings--one containing two nitrogen atoms and four carbon atoms, and the other containing two nitrogen and three carbons.