x-ray

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x-ray

(eks'rā),
1. The ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from the excitation of the inner orbital electrons by the bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode. Synonym(s): roentgen ray Compare: glass rays, indirect rays.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. Synonym(s): radiograph

x-ray

or

X-ray

(ĕks′rā′)
n. or x ray or X ray
1.
a. A photon of electromagnetic radiation of very short wavelength, ranging from about 10 down to 0.01 nanometers, and very high energy, ranging from about 100 up to 100,000 electron volts.
b. often x-rays or X-rays A narrow beam of such photons. X-rays are used for their penetrating power in radiography, radiology, radiotherapy, and scientific research. Also called roentgen ray.
2.
a. A photograph taken with x-rays.
b. The act or process of taking such a photograph: Did the patient move during the x-ray?
tr.v. x-rayed, x-raying, x-rays or X-rayed or X-raying or X-rays
1. To irradiate with x-rays.
2. To photograph with x-rays.

X-ray

High-energy radiation A range of the electromagnetic spectrum used in low doses to diagnose disease and in high doses to treat CA. See Soft X-rays.
X-ray exposure
Diagnostic x-rays Impart 30-150 keV of energy; rare reports vaguely suggest a relationship between exposure to low- level X-rays and a slight ↑ in myeloproliferative disorders and a minimal ↑ risk for developing myeloma
Therapeutic x-rays
• Low level radiation, eg 5-10 keV or 'grenz' radiation–may be used to treat recalcitrant skin conditions–eg, psoriasis
• High level radiation, eg megaelectron-volt–MeV) radiation–may be used to treat internal malignancy

x-ray

()
1. The ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from the excitation of the inner orbital electrons by the bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. A radiograph.
Synonym(s): roentgen ray.

X-ray

A form of electromagnetic radiation produced when a beam of high-speed electrons, accelerated by a high voltage, strikes a metal, such as copper or tungsten. X-radiation penetrates matter to a degree depending on the voltage used to produce it and the density of the matter. It acts on normal photographic film in much the same way as does visible light, but can also produce an image on a fluorescing screen. These properties make X-radiation valuable in medical diagnosis. X-rays are damaging to tissue, especially rapidly reproducing tissues, and can be used to treat various cancers (see RADIOTHERAPY).

X-ray

an ionizing radiation that is a powerful MUTAGEN with wavelengths between 10–1 and 10 nm on the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM. X-rays are produced by bombarding a metallic target with fast electrons in a vacuum, and are capable of penetrating various thicknesses of solids. Having passed through a solid they can act on a photographic plate producing a light/shade pattern indicative of the solid structure.

Roentgen,

Wilhelm K., German physicist and Nobel laureate, 1845-1923.
roentgen - the international unit of exposure dose for x-rays or gamma rays.
roentgen ray - Synonym(s): x-ray
roentgenograph - Synonym(s): radiograph

x-ray

()
1. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from excitation of inner orbital electrons by bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. Synonym(s): radiograph.
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