x-ray

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Related to X-Ray Spectrum: electromagnetic spectrum

x-ray

(eks'rā),
1. The ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from the excitation of the inner orbital electrons by the bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode. Synonym(s): roentgen ray Compare: glass rays, indirect rays.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. Synonym(s): radiograph

x-ray

or

X-ray

(ĕks′rā′)
n. or x ray or X ray
1.
a. A photon of electromagnetic radiation of very short wavelength, ranging from about 10 down to 0.01 nanometers, and very high energy, ranging from about 100 up to 100,000 electron volts.
b. often x-rays or X-rays A narrow beam of such photons. X-rays are used for their penetrating power in radiography, radiology, radiotherapy, and scientific research. Also called roentgen ray.
2.
a. A photograph taken with x-rays.
b. The act or process of taking such a photograph: Did the patient move during the x-ray?
tr.v. x-rayed, x-raying, x-rays or X-rayed or X-raying or X-rays
1. To irradiate with x-rays.
2. To photograph with x-rays.

X-ray

High-energy radiation A range of the electromagnetic spectrum used in low doses to diagnose disease and in high doses to treat CA. See Soft X-rays.
X-ray exposure
Diagnostic x-rays Impart 30-150 keV of energy; rare reports vaguely suggest a relationship between exposure to low- level X-rays and a slight ↑ in myeloproliferative disorders and a minimal ↑ risk for developing myeloma
Therapeutic x-rays
• Low level radiation, eg 5-10 keV or 'grenz' radiation–may be used to treat recalcitrant skin conditions–eg, psoriasis
• High level radiation, eg megaelectron-volt–MeV) radiation–may be used to treat internal malignancy

x-ray

()
1. The ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from the excitation of the inner orbital electrons by the bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. A radiograph.
Synonym(s): roentgen ray.

X-ray

A form of electromagnetic radiation produced when a beam of high-speed electrons, accelerated by a high voltage, strikes a metal, such as copper or tungsten. X-radiation penetrates matter to a degree depending on the voltage used to produce it and the density of the matter. It acts on normal photographic film in much the same way as does visible light, but can also produce an image on a fluorescing screen. These properties make X-radiation valuable in medical diagnosis. X-rays are damaging to tissue, especially rapidly reproducing tissues, and can be used to treat various cancers (see RADIOTHERAPY).

X-ray

an ionizing radiation that is a powerful MUTAGEN with wavelengths between 10–1 and 10 nm on the ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM. X-rays are produced by bombarding a metallic target with fast electrons in a vacuum, and are capable of penetrating various thicknesses of solids. Having passed through a solid they can act on a photographic plate producing a light/shade pattern indicative of the solid structure.

Roentgen,

Wilhelm K., German physicist and Nobel laureate, 1845-1923.
roentgen - the international unit of exposure dose for x-rays or gamma rays.
roentgen ray - Synonym(s): x-ray
roentgenograph - Synonym(s): radiograph

x-ray

()
1. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation emitted from a highly evacuated tube, resulting from excitation of inner orbital electrons by bombardment of the target anode with a stream of electrons from a heated cathode.
2. Ionizing electromagnetic radiation produced by the excitation of the inner orbital electrons of an atom by other processes, such as nuclear delay and its sequelae.
3. Synonym(s): radiograph.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2014) Firm detection of a cyclotron resonance feature with Suzaku in the X-ray spectrum of GRO J1008-57 during a giant outburst in 2012.
Depending on the pressure, the environmental gas can be detected in the x-ray spectrum as an apparent major, minor, or trace constituent relative to the legitimate peak from the target.
The strong gravitational forces near the black hole alter the reflected X-ray spectrum. The larger the change in the spectrum, the closer the inner edge of the disk must be to the black hole.
An X-ray spectrum of GRB 011211, which went off last December 11th, shows promising signs of several expected elements, according to an April 4th Nature paper by Leicester University astronomer James N.
Astronomers find they can now see sharply and deeply enough in the X-ray spectrum to solve some long-standing mysteries and uncover some new ones.
Evidence for this idea comes from the elongation of the X-rays running from the top left to the bottom right and details of the X-ray spectrum. There are also signs of interactions between a central source and the surrounding gas, particularly the yellow arc of H II emission located above and to the left of the black hole.
"What we need is a good X-ray spectrum of the aurora," says Gladstone.
According to ASCA astronomer Hajime Inoue of the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Tokyo, the emissions from active galaxies at these low energies don't match the relatively flat X-ray spectrum recorded by the telescope.
Capitalizing on the sensitivity of the Suzaku satellite, a team led by Yamaguchi and Midori Ozawa, a graduate student at Kyoto University, detected unusual features in the X-ray spectrum of IC 443, better known to amateur astronomers as the Jellyfish Nebula.
Next, the X-ray spectrum can reveal the amount of gas near the star that the X-rays have passed through.
* A preliminary X-ray spectrum of the bright binary star Capella, showing emission lines from ionized iron and silicon.
By analyzing Chandra's X-ray spectrum - akin to a fingerprint of energy - and applying it to theoretical models, Ho and his colleague Craig Heinke, from the University of Alberta, determined that the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, or Cas A for short, has an ultra-thin coating of carbon.