Wuchereria bancrofti


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Wu·cher·e·ri·a ban·croft·i

the bancroftian filaria, a species endemic in the South Pacific islands, coastal China, India, and Myanmar, and throughout tropical Africa and northeastern South America (including certain Caribbean islands). Transmitted to humans (apparently the only definitive host) by mosquitoes, especially Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes pseudoscutellaris, but also by several other species of Culex, Aedes, Anopheles, and Mansonia, depending on the specific geographic area. Adults are white, 40-100 mm, cylindric, threadlike worms, and the microfilariae are ensheathed, with a rounded anterior end and a tapered, nonnucleated tail; the adult worms inhabit the larger lymphatic vessels (for example, in the lower extremities, breasts, spermatic cord, and retroperitoneal tissues) and the sinuses of lymph nodes (for example, the popliteal, femoral, and inguinal groups, as well as the epitrochlear and axillary nodes), where they sometimes temporarily obstruct the flow of lymph and cause slight to moderate inflammation.

Wu·cher·e·ri·a ban·crof·ti

(vū-kĕr-ē'rē-ă ban-krof'tī)
The bancroftian filaria, transmitted to humans (apparently the only definitive host) by mosquitoes, especially Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes pseudoscutellaris, but also by several other species of Culex, Aedes, Anopheles, and Mansonia, depending on the specific geographic area; adults are white, threadlike worms, and the microfilariae are ensheathed, with rounded anterior end and tapered, nonnucleated tail; the adult worms inhabit the larger lymphatic vessels (e.g., in the extremities, breasts, spermatic cord, and retroperitoneal tissues) and the sinuses of lymph nodes, where they sometimes cause temporary obstruction of lymph flow and slight or moderate inflammation.

Wuchereria bancrofti

A parasitic worm that is the causative agent of elephantiasis. Adults of the species live in human lymph nodes and ducts. Females give birth to sheathed microfilariae, which remain in internal organs during the day but at night are in circulating blood, where they are sucked up by night-biting mosquitoes, in which they continue their development, becoming infective larvae in about 2 weeks. They are then passed on to humans when the mosquito bites.
Synonym: Filaria bancrofti
See also: Wuchereria

Wucherer,

Otto, German physician, 1820-1873.
Wuchereria bancrofti - the bancroftian filaria.
Wuchereria - genus of filarial nematodes.
wuchereriasis - infection with worms of the genus Wuchereria.
References in periodicals archive ?
quinquefasciatus should not be neglected, as it likely plays an important role in maintaining viruses within bird populations and is responsible for transmitting the filarial nematode Wuchereria bancrofti, which is still endemic in the Hispaniola (Addiss & Chuke, 2002).
A multi-center field study of two point-of-care tests for circulating Wuchereria bancrofti antigenemia in Africa.
Conviene, para concluir, recordar el gran numero de enfermedades vectoriales cuyo entorno mas favorable tiene que ver con los ciclos de sus hospedadores intermediarios, desde arbovirosis (fiebre del valle del Rift, dengue, fiebre amarilla o fiebre de Nilo occidental) hasta parasitosis como las tripanosomosis (chagas, enfermedad del sueno), oncocercosis (ceguera de los rios) por Onchocerca volvulus, filariosis linfatica por Wuchereria bancrofti o la malaria; y algunas bacterianas mediadas por garrapatas (tularemia, enfermedad de Lyme, fiebre botonosa mediterranea, tifus, fiebre hemorragica de Crimea-Congo, fiebre Q, ehrlichiosis) (Saker, et al.
Filariasis, caused by infestation of the lymph nodes by the parasite Wuchereria bancrofti , is the most common and global cause of secondary lymphedema.[2] The precise role of some pathogens in lymphatic obstruction is uncertain.
[1] It is caused by lymphatic dwelling nematodes namely Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori, and transmitted by the bite of infective mosquitoes.
Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae), is the most common mosquito in rural and urban areas which in capable of transferring a number of pathogens i.e., West Nile Virus (WNV) (CDC, 2002; Turell et al., 2001;Alouani et al., 2009), avian pox virus, bird malaria pathogen, dog heartworm, Dirofilaria immitis, filarial nematode, Wuchereria bancrofti (Vinogradova, 2000) and St.
pahangi, and Wuchereria bancrofti," Experimental Parasitology emphasizes, vol.
Scott, "Transmission of the nocturnal periodic strain of Wuchereria bancrofti by Culex quinquefasciatus: establishing the potential for urban filariasis in Thailand," Epidemiology and Infection, vol.
In addition to a filarial infection caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, the most common etiology of secondary penoscrotal lymphedema, several conditions are known to be causative.
Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a disease of considerable socio-economic burden in the tropics and sub-tropics and is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and B.