Working Time Regulations

Working Time Regulations

The UK version of the European Working Time Directive, which became law in 1998. From 1991 to 2003, doctors in training were covered by the New Deal for Junior Doctors, a package of measures to improve the conditions under which they worked. From August 2003 all juniors were limited by contract to 56 hours of active work. As of August 2009, this dropped to 48 hours of active work per week.
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Employers are obliged (under the Working Time Regulations 1998) to give workers at least 5.
The Contractor confirms by submitting his offer that the execution of the services corresponds to the German accident prevention, occupational safety and working time regulations as well as the German and EU-wide generally accepted safety and working medical rules.
Michael Hibbs, chairman of the employment law committee at Birmingham Law Society said: "Employers are not required to give 'smoking breaks' on top of the usual breaks required under the Working Time Regulations 1998.
The Working Time Regulations (WTR), the UK version of the European Working Time Directive, have applied to all junior doctors since 2004.
A RECENT European Court of Justice (ECJ) decision, which ruled that a Spanish security alarm company breached working time regulations, could have a big impact on Scottish businesses.
The European Court of Justice reviewed the legislation on working time which, in the UK, is the Working Time Regulations 1998.
It is over 10 years since the courts decided a worker too sick to work, could continue to accrue holiday under the Working Time Regulations.
The law on this (The Working Time Regulations 1988) says that you can bring backdated payment claims but that you must do so within three months from the date that you should have been paid.
The judgments ruled that the calculation of holiday pay based on working time regulations introduced in 1998 was not correct and must now include overtime and can include backdated claims.
With the introduction of the Working Time Regulations in 1998, full time employees were given the right to four weeks holiday per year which, over the years, has risen to the current 5.
A Department for Business, Innovation and Skills spokesman said: "Changes to the working time regulations need to be made because of European Court rulings, however Government will do all it can to minimise the burden on business.
Employers commented in the survey that the Working Time Regulations were of great concern, but the regulations derive from an EU Directive and cannot simply be repealed.