European Working Time Directive

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European Working Time Directive

A European Union mandate introduced in 1998 which is designed to protect the health and safety of workers by restricting the number of hours an individual can work and imposing minimum rest periods. In brief, the EWTD limits the average weekly working time to 48 hours; limits night workers’ average daily working time to 8 hours; requires that employers offer health assessments to night workers; and imposes minimum daily and weekly rest periods and rest breaks at work.

European Working Time Directive, specifics
• ≤ 48 hours work/week (averaged over reference period of 26 weeks).
• Maximum of 13 hours continuous duty on a full-shift rota.
• 11 hours continuous rest in 24 hours.
• 24 hours continuous rest in 7 days.
• Never more than 12 consecutive days on duty (followed by a minimum of 48 hours off duty).
• Minimum of 4 weeks paid annual leave.
• 20-minute break in work periods of over 6 hours.
• For night workers, an average of ≤ 8 hours work in 24 over the reference period.
References in periodicals archive ?
"PDFORRA is currently considering over 30 cases of breach of the Working Time Directive and we believe many more will follow.
Scrapping the Working Time Directive protections would be detrimental for workers, especially those who already experience precarious working conditions.
The Working Time Directive and Working Time Regulations (WTR) essentially deals with rest breaks, associated recording keeping and health assessments.
The working time directive was well intentioned but the way it was implemented had caused problems across the NHS, he warned.
About 80% of 980 NHS surgeons and surgical trainees surveyed said care had worsened since the European Working Time Directive started last August.
The Royal College of Surgeons and pressure group RemedyUK have warned that the European Working Time Directive could wreak havoc if there is a second wave of swine flu in the autumn.
The European Working Time Directive (EWTD) will cut junior doctors' working weeks from 56 to 48 hours.
The work plan will be introduced in August next year as part of the European Working Time Directive.
Ruling on a Netherlands case, which will become an EU-wide precedent, the court said such systems broke the European working time directive, which says workers must have four weeks paid leave annually.
From March 2005 transport managers will be faced with the challenge of planning Working Time Directive (WTD) compliant transport schedules, at the same time minimising the associated extra costs that have been widely predicted for the transport industry.
And one nurse worked 42 hours when she was supposed to be on annual leave, according to claims by Unison, who say many NHS boards are breaching the Working Time Directive, stating there must be an 11-hour rest period between shifts.
But in August, Executive figures showed 650 junior docs in 11 of Scotland's 15 health boards were working more than the European Working Time Directive limit of 58 hours a week.