workers' compensation

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workers' compensation

(wûr′kərz)
n.
Payments required by law to be made to an employee who is injured or disabled in connection with work.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

workers' compensation

Workman's compensation Occupational medicine The benefits provided to employees for injuries suffered in the workplace Epidemiology Work-related injuries affect 8 million employees/yr–US resulting in the loss of 73 million work days and 10,000 lives
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

wor·kers' com·pen·sa·tion

(WC) (wŏr'kĕrz kom'pĕn-sā'shŭn)
The U.S. social insurance system for industrial and work injuries regulated at a state level. Sometimes called workman's compensation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

workers' compensation

A payment or payments made to an employee injured or disabled on the job. In most states, after a qualifying medical examination, an employee is certified as having specific functional impairments as the result of a documented injury. A predetermined amount of money, based on the severity of the injury and its consequences, is paid to the employee until the impairments improve or resolve.
See also: compensation
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
"In order to do so, a business should ask for a certificate of workers' comp insurance before work begins," Troutman said.
Illinois no longer ranks near the top for costs in the workers' comp system.
Related: Video: NUPC Excellence in Workers' Comp Risk Management award winners on WCI TV
* How has your workers' comp loss control program evolved over the past three years?
Workers' comp insurance premiums are based on three primary factors: the size of the employer's payroll (which can include wages, bonuses, and pay for overtime work, holidays, vacations, and periods of sickness), employee job classifications, and the company's experience modifier or loss history.
A lesson from the past is that major socio-economic turning points have an effect on workers' comp. Today, we need to take into account the massive increase in healthcare costs and the hard right turn in political sentiment.
As a result of Workers' Comp Executive's reporting, two board members were fired, three high-ranking executives were also fired, and two major investigations--one criminal and one civil--were launched.
The new rates are only industry averages and will have varying impacts on workers' comp rates when individual risk factors are applied for each business.
The upshot of such efforts was a 9.6 percent reduction in workers' comp accidents in 2004, "and we expect savings over the next several years as a result of those improvements," he says.
Existing law requires general contractors to carry workers' comp insurance.
Lee Smith produces more than 80 newsletters and other information products for human resource professionals, business executives and attorneys, including such titles as Federal Employment Law Insider, HR Insight, state-specific employment law newsletters for all 50 states, environmental law letters such as California Environmental Insider and Georgia Environmental Law Letter, and titles for workers' compensation administrators, including Florida Workers' Comp Reporter and Texas Workers' Comp Reporter.
The state has seen some of the highest workers' comp premiums in the nation--costs that have skyrocketed 136 percent on average in just the past four years.

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