job sharing

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job sharing

A flexible work arrangement in the UK in which two people/job-share partners divide one full-time job by splitting the day or week, or alternating on and off weeks, job responsibilities, pay and benefits.
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An employer is deemed to have satisfied its obligation to provide the certificate if the employer certifies that a reduction in health benefits and retirement benefits that is scheduled to occur while the plan is in effect applies to employees who are participating in work sharing in the same manner as it applies to employees who are not participating in work sharing.
Although work sharing means a proportional reduction in wages, these are often supplemented by partial unemployment payments funded by governments.
The widespread sense of having to earn enough to live a "normal" consumer lifestyle, one that is sold to us through advertising and reinforced by cultural norms, reflects the immense structural and social barriers to work sharing that exist in industrialized growth-driven economies.
Massachusetts passed work sharing legislation in 1988, but its use has soared in the past year.
Like Work Sharing, the primary intent of this program is to avoid layoffs.
Health, Labor and Welfare Minister Chikara Sakaguchi and Hiroshi Okuda, chairman of the Japan Business Federation (Nippon Keidanren), were among some 40 people who took part in a forum held in Tokyo to discuss work sharing and other labor issues.
OUTCOMES MEASURED Outcomes assessed at 6 months postpartum included work commitments, household work sharing, mental and physical health, and partner relationship.
The work sharing scheme will cover 12 weeks with half-time work for approximately 1,200 employees.
Work sharing involves available work being distributed as evenly as possible among all workers, or else reducing overall work time, when production slackens to prevent layoffs.
Sanyo's decision to adopt work sharing comes from expectations that it will increasingly suffer from surplus workers, particularly in the manufacturing sector.
The authors' proposals to encourage work sharing can be divided into two groups.
It has space to house more than 200 engineers and support staff, and will utilize a wide range of engineering software platforms, facilitating work sharing between offices and flexibility in responding to customer requirements.