etymology

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etymology

(ĕt″ĭ-mŏl′ō-jē) [L. etymon, origin of a word, + logos, word, reason]
The science of the origin and development of words. Most medical words are derived from Latin and Greek, but many of those from Greek have come through Latin and have been modified by it. Generally, when two Greek words are used to form one word, they are connected by the letter “o.” Many medical words have been formed from one or more roots—forms used or adapted from Latin or Greek—and many are modified by a prefix, a suffix, or both. A knowledge of important Latin and Greek roots and prefixes will reveal the meanings of many other words.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Little Oxford Dictionary of Word Origins will be priced at GBP9.99.
But Shipley's Dictionary of Word Origins does not bother with the word horn, sending us directly to the word bugle, where we learn that a bugle (Old French, from the Latin buculus and diminutive of bos, bovis, or ox) originally referred to a buffalo, and that the English word buff (think also beef or in French boeuf made superficial work of its subject by identifying the ox by its hide rather than its horns.
These strategies should include phonetic and visual strategies, an understanding of morphemes and an understanding of etymology, or word origins. When approaching words, either during a spelling investigation or from list, students may then apply more than memory to the spelling process.
In addition to baseball, his interest included word origins, opera, country music, gardening and bridge.
These 'user friendly' lists about people, dates, mathematical formulas, word origins, etc., will substantially assist the sparking of curiosity and a desire to learn in the student--and so much more!
Definitions give parts of speech, though no information on word origins, and sometimes include sentences to illustrate usage.
There have been general overviews (David Crystal's English as a Global Language), dictionaries of derivations (John Ayto's Dictionary of Word Origins), concentrations on origins of particularly fascinating words (Craig M.
Douglas Harper, a historian and author based in Lancaster, Pa., said he began working on the site "after I looked one day for a free dictionary of word origins online and found that there was none.
In its more "obscure origin burst is associated to umbilicus," (Oxford English Dictionary) as in "to burst the navel" (Shipley's Dictionary of Word Origins [7]).
As I run a popular Web site and send out umpteen thousand copies of a newsletter by email each week (and get about a thousand replies), I have come to expect the occasional incoming message that puts forward an odd ideas about word origins. A good example happened in Halloween week, after I'd written a piece about the origin of What the Sam Hill as a euphemism for invoking the devil.
According to the Dictionary of Word Origins: "The ancients believed that soul and body could part and that under great emotional stress the soul would actually leave the body.