wool

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wool

(wul),
The hair of the sheep; sometimes, when defatted, used as a surgical dressing.
Synonym(s): lana
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing largely on the work of earlier scholars, Rose places the wool trade firmly in the context of English medieval society, rather than concentrating on its mechanics and economic impact.
She concludes with a survey of the behaviour of merchants and clothiers at different periods and the reasons why, towards the end, the English wool trade was in decline.
A thriving wool trade starting in the 13th century, for example, helped some Italians amass enough wealth to later support famous artists of the Renaissance, including Michelangelo.
By this time the white robed monks who brewed their own beer, fermented their own wine and made a profit from the wool trade were highly esteemed and renowned for their charity and were at the centre of commerce, intrigue and politics in their vast estate.
During the industrial revolution, the area was a major centre for the wool trade. But now, it's the rolling hills, distinctive architecture, and relative proximity to London which have made it a favourite haunt for holidaymakers, celebrities and the power elite.
Smith contrasts Samuel Richardson's servant heroine in Pamela (1740) with invective aired during the Calico Crisis (1719-21), when wool manufacturers condemned domestic servants as "promiscuous shoppers" whose efforts to imitate the dress of their betters and resulting avidity for imported Indian cotton threatened to destroy that embodiment of "English masculinity and patriotic spirit," the "domestic wool trade" (111).
THE NEIGHBOURHOOD Lavenham is a sheer delight, its listed - and listing - buildings designed for exploring local history founded on the once-rich wool trade. So too is the glorious Suffolk landscape.
The houses - two Gothicstyle buildings on the quayside - were built for Scottish merchants as Veere was a major port in the wool trade.
Describing the gift as an "esquilmo" would metonymically remind the Duke of the primary source fueling the family's coffers, the wool trade, and of his ability to reward the fruit of Encina's labors.
He leased some local pasture and embarked on a career as a middleman in the wool trade. Chapter Three explores Heritage's "country," where he did his farming and trading, an area extending about eight miles from Moreton in the counties of Gloucestershire, Warwickshire, Worcester, and Oxfordshire, with occasional trips further afield.
A centre of the wool trade in the Middle Ages, Stamford became one of the country's most important towns, and much of its cobbled and timbered centre is still intact.