Wolff


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Wolff

(volf),
Julius, German anatomist, 1836-1902. See: Wolff law.

Wolff

(volf),
Kaspar F., German embryologist in Russia, 1733-1794. See: wolffian body, wolffian cyst, wolffian duct, wolffian rest, wolffian ridge, wolffian tubules.

Wolff

(volf),
Louis, U.S. cardiologist, 1898-1972. See: Wolff-Chaikoff block, Wolff-Chaikoff effect, Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The workers offering their support do so because they know full well the fate of Harland and Wolff could come to all our doors.
Seventeen years later, Wolff walked up to Verplank at Oak Tree and introduced himself, and they played nine holes.
A copy of Wolff's new book was obtained by the Guardian and the underlying documents examined.
Monte Carlo: The Mercedes team principal, Toto Wolff, delivered an emotional tribute to Niki Lauda at the Monaco Grand Prix.
Moreover, it was noted that Wolff will take part and speak at the international conference "Interconnectedness in Central Asia: Challenges and New Opportunities", which will be held February 19-20 in Tashkent.
Wolff said he first became impressed with Bell during the campaign, then volunteered to help with the transition.
As a test and development driver at the Williams F1 team, Wolff repeated the feat at that year's race in Germany -- and in the following season in Spain and Silverstone.
And now Wolff insisted that Riccardo would definitely be on their shortlist if Mercedes decide to rope in the drivers outside the current set-up
Asked about Blair calling it a "complete fabrication", Wolff said: "Tony Blair is a complete liar - literally 15ft away from me."
20, I took up something like a semipermanent seat of a couch in the West Wing,' Wolff writes.
The first thing an attentive reader notices about Fire and Fury (besides the cover, which looks like something a fourth-grader would mock up in an introductory Photoshop class) is that the book is filled to overflowing with he-said-she-said, over-the-top, salacious, scathing gossip that Wolff claims he uncovered as a result of "more than two hundred interviews" that he doggedly conducted "over a period of eighteen months." The biggest problem with that is that Wolff--claiming to have spent all that time and effort collecting gossip--dumps it all on the reader without anything resembling a journalist's skill for fact-checking.