witch-hunt

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witch-hunt

'Whistleblowing', see there.
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In England, the majority of witchcraft trials took place in twice-yearly assize courts before senior, experienced Westminster judges, who were culturally and socially distanced from the malice and local tensions usually surrounding witchcraft prosecution.
In the other witchcraft trials, the issues of training, validity of methods and efficacy of results had not been addressed; by implication they were meaningless categories.
The historical witchcraft trials of Salem town reflect on the American justice system.
The witchcraft trials and executions of pilgrim days come to mind.
Between 1560 and 1650 hundreds of witchcraft trials took place across the country and the last execution of an English witch occurred in 1685.
The Act criminalizes only harmful witchcraft practices, thus insulating the practices of traditional healers, and it offers a regime for the admission of expert testimony in witchcraft trials.
One of the great values of Rainer Decker's sweeping treatment of the papacy's role in European witchcraft trials from the late middle ages to the modern era is to contextualize the Church's position on witchcraft against the backdrop of the constant struggle between secular and ecclesiastical authorities, as well as its attempt to limit potential heresy while not enflaming persecutions.
It also brings to the English corpus the fruit of additional regional studies of witchcraft trials undertaken in secular courts, previously only available in Spanish.
The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History has recently added an audio podcast section to its website, where it is now possible to listen to lectures on major topics in American history which include the Civil War, the Salem Witchcraft trials, the Great Depression and the Cold War.
According to Conde, race, gender, and Tituba's native spirituality contributed to her being one of the first formally accused witches of the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692.
The fullest discussion of the legal and judicial aspects of the trials is Holier, Salem Witchcraft Trials, esp.
His study ranges over such cultural fictions as civic pageantry, theater, and witchcraft trials. Rather than merely replicating and supporting hierarchical structures, Witmore argues that these cultural productions of the imagination also manage to elude such a reductive dialectical paradigm of power and subversion.