witch-hunt

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witch-hunt

'Whistleblowing', see there.
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Soon after, "WITCH HUNT," in all capitals, became a top-trending Twitter topic Thursday.
In a country whose prime minister launched a witch hunt in his speeches in election rallies, many malicious people will thrive.
It takes up topics as varied as Albrecht Durer's wood carvings of hags and demons, the relationship between pictures of witches' Sabbaths to actual witch hunts, the connections between certain pagan goddesses and witch iconography, gender and magic in village folk drama, and the fragmented, image-driven confessions of child-witches.
Chaudhuri explained that witch hunts are fueled by the tribal workers' belief in the existence of witches and the desperate need of this poor, illiterate population to make sense of rampant diseases in villages with no doctors or medical facilities.
But this piece of common sense is not yet lost to me: in studying witchcraft and witch hunts, historians' eyes are filled with bitterness and bloodshed if they allow their eyes to be fixed on the cruelties of the human past, to the deprivation of the wholesomeness and meaningfulness of human existence on earth and in the universe.
Witch hunts against gay people are essentially a 20th-century phenomenon, ushered in by the introduction of "the homosexual" as a recognized social type in the late 19th century.
'There must not be and will not be any witch hunts in the Conservative Party over people's views on Europe.'
According to retired public prosecutor GE-ltekin Avcy, witch hunts have no place in democracies.
The study of the Reformation witch hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Europe and North America is still a topic overlaid with emotion and colored by the beliefs of the student.
For instance: the relationship between demonological writings and particular witch hunts (101); the psychology of the German prince-bishops who presided over some of the most extreme persecutions (119); or the recent end of downward revision of numbers of executions in favor of a cautious recognition that new discoveries are increasing the numbers somewhat (157); or the survey of the last legal executions in Europe (187-89).
251-55), where Stark claims that witch hunts took place in "political vacuums" with lack of strong central governance, religious conflict, and existence of magic.
It is essential reading for those interested in the witch hunts, as well as those with a general interest in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century thought.