Wilson

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Related to Wilson's: Wilson's disease

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
Clifford, English physician, 1906-1997. See: Kimmelstiel-Wilson disease.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
James, English anatomist, physiologist, and surgeon, 1765-1821. See: Wilson muscle.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
Miriam G., 20th-century U.S. pediatrician. See: Wilson-Mikity syndrome.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
Samuel A. Kinnier, English neurologist, 1878-1937. See: Wilson disease.

Wil·son

(wil'sŏn),
William J.E., English dermatologist, 1809-1884. See: Wilson disease.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Wilson's charges are a second-degree felony, punishable by two to 20 years in prison, with a fine of up to $10,000.
Wilson's organization, Defense Distributed, is allowing customers to set their own price for any of 10 gun designs posted on his website.
Thus, early in Wilson's presidency, House was a useful advisor, never intruding himself on the president and seeing Wilson only periodically.
Madam President brings Edith Wilson's so-called petticoat government to its rightful light, and offers a poignant look at Woodrow Wilson, as a lover, a husband, and a leader.
Elizabeth Banks as Melinda Ledbetter, the Cadillac saleswoman who enters Wilson's life, draws out viewers' sympathy for Wilson.
Not every essay is completely favorable to Wilson: Victoria Bissell Brown points out how Wilson's vision of education for woman was limited to roles supporting men.
Wilson's commitment to this view, however, seemed destined to bring about war with Germany, leading Wilson, Tucker argues, to reevaluate the country's neutrality policy.
Wilson had just finished fueling his car and had pulled off to the side to take a cellphone call when Dotson got out of another vehicle, walked up to Wilson's car, pretended he had a gun, and ordered Wilson from the car.
It is imperative to start with an account of Ellis Wilson's background and artistic development because the account of the different stages of Wilson's artistic career elucidates the necessity of his trip to Haiti in his systematic artistic growth.
Generating and inspiring such generous philanthropy--to borrow Wilson's own phrase--the collection soon began to collect itself, and when Wilson and Long decided to donate more than 400 of their own pieces, it became clear that a more ambitious vision was required for the sustained future of Pallant House, a vision that would surpass earlier options simply to extend the galleries into the rear garden.
Because Wilson's "Englishness" is a modern phenomenon, labels like Renaissance, Reformation, and even Enlightenment (although the term is used) do not apply.