Owen

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O·wen

(ō'wĕn),
Richard, English anatomist, 1804-1892. See: Owen lines, contour lines of Owen, interglobular space of Owen.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Wilfred Owen Story has become the North West's one-stop hub for people who are interested in Wilfred Owen.34 Argyle Street, Birkenhead, CH41 6AE
Diddorol oedd gweld y tebygrwydd rhwng Hedd Wyn a Wilfred Owen, y ddau y dod i enwogrwydd wedi iddynt farw.
The critics who glory in the works of Wilfred Owen, Sassoon and those others sharing the poets' pantheon seem to forget him, maybe because they find none of the elegiac wonder of Owen, perhaps the finest of all, in his verse.
THE works of war poet Wilfred Owen were a constant theme of Dean Johnson's school life as a teenager.
I was very familiar with Wilfred Owen's poetry while I was still in high school.
This is useful, particularly for students with poor sense of history, to contextualise Wilfred Owen in time.
1947), Lowry makes two explicit but subtle allusions to the World War One poet Wilfred Owen's "An Anthem for Doomed Youth." Through Geoffrey Firmin's musing observation about the guns of a Mexican firing practice that recalls the rifles of Owen's poem, Lowry suggests how Firmin's wife's former affair with his friend Jacques Laruelle has figuratively killed their marriage.
Poets, is also the longest with works on a wide range of people and groups: Donne, Clare, Leigh Hunt, Joseph Severn, Christina Rosetti, William Barnes, Thomas Hardy, Robert Frost, Ivor Gurney, Wilfred Owen, Sir John Betjeman, Robert Lowell, W.S.
Wilfred Owen provides the indictment of the glorious portrayal of war in the lines from his well-known poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" (1917):</p> <pre> If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs, Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues, My friend, you would not tell with such high zest To children ardent for some desperate glory, The old Lie; Dulce et Decorum est Pro patria mori.
The British poets Wilfred Owen, Ivor Gurney, and Siegfried Sassoon were all psychologically altered by the events of WWI.