Wilde


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Wilde

(wīld),
Sir William R.W., Irish oculist and otologist, 1815-1876. See: Wilde cords, Wilde triangle.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to Iarla Manny identifying Wilde's intense study habits in "Oscar as (Ovid as) Orpheus: Misogyny and Pederasty in Dorian Gray and Metamorphoses," the essay shifts the focus of Part IV from Platonic platitudes to the Faustian legend along with Ovid's Metamorphoses in which the story of Narcissus is "conventionally considered the most important mythological source for Oscar Wilde's sole novel" (267).
The basic idea -- and one which Oscar and his love of the unusual would no doubt approve -- is that a musician improvises an accompaniment to various readings of Wilde's works.
The newspapers, meanwhile, had spent the trial brimming with lurid innuendoes about Wilde's lifestyle.
"The Happy Prince" conveys the declining Wilde's pain, despair and self-pity, but also the writer's defiant banter.
The book's compelling strategy is to shift attention from the charge of plagiarism in two directions: to Chatterton's significance in Victorian attitudes toward Romanticism and to his importance in Wilde's thinking and writing.
It took almost 120 years for Wilde to be granted a posthumous pardon.
In the "Happy Prince", Wilde - the most popular playwright in London in his time - remembers his old life, plays, fame and family, before being imprisoned for two years of labor.
Now, Wilde is inviting women and men of all generations into her world, and she gives them a lot to see and soak in.
Curator Dominique Morel said a major Wilde exhibition was long overdue.
Like all of Oscar Wilde's writing, De Profundis (a title retroactively given to the work by Wilde's friend and literary executor, Robert Ross) has been widely studied.
While the essays in Intentions, originally written both for the edification of the Philistine public and the delectation of Wilde's coterie, might appear to be of a completely different order to Collini's powerful defense of the Humanities (Wilde, Letters n.
In this essential new work, Eleanor Fitzsimons reframes Wilde's story and his legacy through the women in his life, including such scintillating figures as Florence Balcombe; actress Lillie Langtry; and his tragic and witty niece, Dolly, who, like Wilde, loved fast cars, cocaine, and foreign women.