mutant

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mutant

 [mu´tant]
1. in genetics, a variation that breeds true, owing to genetic changes.
2. produced by mutation.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mu·tant

(myū'tant),
1. A phenotype in which a mutation is manifested.
2. A gene that is rare and usually harmful, in contrast to a wild-type gene, not necessarily generated recently.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mutant

(myo͞ot′nt)
n.
An organism, cell, virus, or gene resulting from genetic mutation.
adj.
Resulting from genetic mutation: a mutant strain of bacteria.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mu·tant

(myū'tănt)
1. A phenotype in which a mutation is manifested.
2. A gene that is rare and usually harmful, in contrast to a wild-type gene, not necessarily generated recently.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mutant

Any organism or cell with a gene or genes that have suffered a MUTATION.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

mutant

  1. any gene that has undergone a MUTATION.
  2. an individual showing the effects of a mutation, with a phenotype that is not WILD TYPE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

mu·tant

(myū'tănt)
A phenotype in which a mutation is manifested.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to the wild-type gene (CYP2D6*1), at least 15 different alleles of CYP2D6, associated with deficient, reduced, normal, or increased enzyme activity, are known in Caucasians.
Germline BRCA mutation carriers (four patients with BRCA1 and 18 with BRCA2) were matched to those with BRCA1/BRCA2 wild-type genes (105 patients).
A) Gyrase A gene; B) gyrase A mutant and wild-type genes.
This is very relevant for rare mutation detection, where the mutations are infrequent (typically less than one percent) on a background of normal, wild-type genes.
The lower limits of detection of the conventional methods are in the range of one mutant form of ras in 10-20 wild-type genes or cells (7).