Whitnall


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Whit·nall

(wit'nawl),
Samuel E., English anatomist, 1876-1952. See: Whitnall tubercle.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The rose garden offers beautiful views of the 1,000-acre arboretum of Whitnall Park.
That, combined with his interest in math and science, set an early course for Stave, who knew he wanted to be an engineer even when he was at Whitnall High School in Greenfield
The show has been written by Tim Whitnall, who wrote the one-man play Morecambe about comedian Eric Morecambe.
The Struggler, supplied by defunct Salford brewery Groves & Whitnall, was on Manchester Road in Hollinwood - on the old tram route to the city - but was pulled down in the nineties to make way for the M60.
Gordon Whitnall, director of the City Planning Commission of Los Angeles and guiding force behind the Los Angeles Regional Planning Commission, established in 1922, admitted that he was "at a loss to know how to approach this broad subject of regional planning" in a speech before the Commonwealth Club in 1923.
Gray, who lived at nearby Whitnall Street, was jailed for five years for terror offences, after he twice attempted to join jihadis in Syria.
(4.) Nigel Farage famously called the Brexit vote "a victory for real people, a victory for ordinary people, a victory for decent people" against "the multinationals," "big merchant banks," "big politics," and "lies, corruption and deceit." See Adam Whitnall, "EU Referendum: Nigel Farage's 4am Victory Speech--The Text in Full," Independent, June 23, 2016, http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/eu-referendum-nigel-farage-4am-victory-speech-the-text-in-full-a7099156.html.
Although Muller's muscle and Whitnall's ligament could be seen in both images, the contrast of the image was significantly improved in the 4K image (Figure 5(b)) compared with the conventional video image (Figure 5(a)).
Gutted DANNY WHITNALL: Denbigh castle is a great display.