complete blood count

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com·plete blood count (CBC),

a combination of the following determinations: red blood cell count, white blood cell count, erythrocyte indices, hematocrit, differential blood count, and sometimes platelet count.

complete blood count

n. Abbr. CBC
The determination of the quantity of each type of blood cell in a given sample of blood, often including the amount of hemoglobin, the hematocrit, and the proportions of various white cells.

complete blood count (CBC)

a determination of the number of red and white blood cells per cubic millimeter of blood. A CBC is one of the most routinely performed tests in a clinical laboratory and one of the most valuable screening and diagnostic techniques. Most laboratories use an electronic counter for reporting numbers of red and white blood cells and platelets. Examining a stained slide of blood yields useful information about red cell morphological characteristics and types of white blood cells (WBCs). The normal red blood cell (RBC) count in adult males is 4.7 to 6.1 million/mm3. In adult females the normal RBC is 4.2 to 5.4 million/mm3. Each type of white blood cell can be represented as a percentage of the total number of white cells observed. This is called a differential count. The normal adult WBC count is 5000 to 10,000/cm3. Electronic blood counters also automatically determine hemoglobin or hematocrit and include this value in the CBC. See also differential white blood cell count, erythrocyte, hematocrit, hemoglobin, leukocyte.

complete blood count

See CBC.

com·plete blood count

(CBC) (kŏm-plēt' blŭd kownt)
A combination of the following determinations: red blood cell indices and count, white blood cell count, hematocrit, hemoglobin, platelets, and differential blood count.

Complete blood count (CBC)

A routine analysis performed on a sample of blood taken from the patient's vein with a needle and vacuum tube. The measurements taken in a CBC include a white blood cell count, a red blood cell count, the red cell distribution width, the hematocrit (ratio of the volume of the red blood cells to the blood volume), and the amount of hemoglobin (the blood protein that carries oxygen). CBCs are a routine blood test used for many medical reasons, not only for AIDS patients. They can help the doctor determine if a patient is in advanced stages of the disease.

com·plete blood count

(kŏm-plēt' blŭd kownt)
Laboratory-based combination of: red blood cell count, white blood cell count, erythrocyte indices, hematocrit, differential blood count, and often a platelet count.
References in periodicals archive ?
The white count becomes extremely elevated and, as these blasts infiltrate the spleen, it may again become massively enlarged.
Reject any specimens with a white count of fewer than 1,000 cells per [mu]l; these specimens are inadequate for testing purposes.
In contrast, if a child with a persistent fever has a white count of 30,000, you really have to be more careful--it could be a sinus infection, pneumonia, or bacteremia.
I also know of an emergency room staff that was reluctant to answer when someone from the laboratory asked whether a patient's symptoms led to an abnormal white count.
The existing analyzer was reading the white count at 6,000 (per [mu]l) and the new one at 12,000.
Years ago, a complete blood count consisted of several manual procedures such as a red cell count and hematocrit, and usually a peripheral blood film evaluation and differential white count.
Klein advised against taking a chance when confronted with an 11-month-old child who has a fever of 105[degrees] F, is irritable, fussy and has a white count of 28,000 with 80% polys, even if the mother says the child had three doses of Prevnar, "Between the nonvaccine types and the vaccine failures, I think we should hold to the current management plan.
Her initial white count was 24,800 with 76% segmented neutrophils, 10% bands, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 126 mm/hour.
Future white counts are therefore likely to be substantially larger than one would predict from current census data.
Have your veterinarian do some baseline red and white counts and see how healthy your dog really is.
In this essay, I rely on official black and white counts and generally do not adjust for estimates of the racial composition of ~other' groups, except in Figure 1 showing long-term trends where Hispanics are included within black and white counts.