white coat hypertension

(redirected from White coat syndrome)

white coat hypertension

frequent or continuous elevations of blood pressure in clinical settings that exceed those measured during ambulatory monitoring of the patient.
Synonym(s): office hypertension
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
A transient increase in blood pressure that occurs in apprehensive patients on seeing a ‘white coat’, especially if the patient is female and the doctor male. This may result in mislabelling the patient as having hypertension and treating as such
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

white coat hypertension

Office hypertension A transient ↑ in blood pressure that occurs in apprehensive Pts on seeing a 'white coat', especially if the Pt is ♀ and the doctor ♂, possibly resulting in inappropriate anti-hypertensive therapy. Cf Pseudohypertension, Small cuff syndrome.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

white coat hy·per·ten·sion

(wīt kōt hī'pĕr-ten'shŭn)
Frequent or continuous elevations of blood pressure in clinical settings that exceed those measured during ambulatory monitoring of the patient.
Synonym(s): office hypertension.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

white coat hypertension

A rise in blood pressure induced by the act of measuring it. People who react in this way show a higher pressure when it is measured by a doctor or nurse than they show on 24-hour ambulatory monitoring measurements that are recorded on a cassette. Assuming the latter method shows acceptable levels, white coat hypertension will usually not require treatment, but close follow-up is required as affected people may develop later complications such as kidney impairment or enlargement of the left ventricle of the heart.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Caused by anxiety, it's become known as white coat syndrome. Fear of doctors is driving your blood pressure up.
Growing up, I had "white coat syndrome" and was terrified of anything and everything medical related.
Key Words: Dental anxiety, dental fear, hypertension, Corah's dental anxiety scale, white coat syndrome, hypertension guidelines.
Steinberg has often seen "white coat syndrome" boost blood pressure readings.
Roxas says that people are afraid to donate blood because of fear of needles, the sight of blood and the "white coat syndrome"or a person's mistrust of doctors or hospitals.
Expectant mums can take part in clinical hypnotherapy, relexology, and soothing massage sessions, helping them with problems including anxiety, needle phobia and white coat syndrome.
The well recognised 'white coat syndrome' has a prevalence of about 10% in the UK and according to NICE data, the syndrome can cause a difference of 20/10mmHg between readings in a clinical setting and those at home (1,3,5).
I think it's called "white coat syndrome." (Well there's a bit of personal health information about me I'm happy to share with all of you!) For me, being nervous is all about the unknown, especially when I am subjecting myself to someone who will totally control the visit while I listen and learn.
WHITE COAT SYNDROME [c] DOCTORS are advised to give up their white coats when attending patients.
This will soothe patients who might exhibit what Stockdale calls "white coat syndrome"--i.e., being nervous about visiting a doctor.
Your BP can fluctuate and "white coat syndrome" often causes anxiety-related high readings when patients attend surgery.
Newer blood pressure monitoring devices for the office are available that obviate artificially high readings caused by errors in technique and by white coat syndrome. Researchers have found that readings taken with the BpTRU automatic device, which obtains and records 5 blood pressure readings over a 5-minute period, are lower than those taken by office personnel, and that the white coat effect is eliminated.