Whipple disease


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Whip·ple dis·ease

(wip'ĕl),
a rare condition characterized by steatorrhea, frequently generalized lymphadenopathy, arthritis, fever, and cough; many "foamy" macrophages are found in the jejunal lamina propria; caused by Tropheryma whippleii. May lead to progressive malnutrition, dementia, and if untreated, death.

Whip·ple dis·ease

(wip'el di-zēz')
A rare disease characterized by steatorrhea, frequently generalized lymphadenopathy, arthritis, fever, and cough; many "foamy" macrophages are found in the jejunal lamina propria; caused by Tropheryma whippleii.

Whipple disease

(hwip'el)
[George Hoyt Whipple, U.S. pathologist, 1878–1976]
An infectious disease with gastrointestinal and systemic features caused by the organism Trophermya whippeli. This rare disease resembles idiopathic steatorrhea. Synonym: intestinal lipodystrophy

Treatment

Intensive antibiotic therapy with procaine penicillin followed by maintenance therapy with tetracycline yields good results.

Whipple,

George Hayt, U.S. pathologist and Nobel laureate, 1878-1976.
Whipple disease - a rare disease characterized by steatorrhea, frequently generalized lymphadenopathy, arthritis, fever, and cough.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gastrointestinal diagnosis of classical Whipple disease: clinical, endoscopic, and histopathologic features in 191 Patients.
Puechal, "Whipple disease revealed by lung involvement: a case report and literature review," Chest, vol.
In Germany, several physicians have been interested in Whipple disease for a long time, resulting in the development of new tools (1,32).
Questions regarding the epidemiologic character of Whipple disease remain unanswered, such as why the bacterium is highly prevalent but the disease is not.
Whipple disease confined to the central nervous system presenting as a solitary frontal tumor: case report.
whipplei serologic assays has enabled delineation between patients with Whipple disease who lack or have weak immune responses against T.
The tinctoral demonstration of a glycoprotein in Whipple disease. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med.
whipplei and Whipple disease in Africa, we conducted a study to assess the prevalence of T.
To the Editor: The clinical spectrum of Whipple disease has widely expanded since its etiologic agent, Tropheryma whipplei, was isolated in 2000 (1).
Common spelling variants and the citation frequency (PubMed) of 4 organisms, Acinetobacter baumannii, Coccidioides immitis (the fungal causal agent of coccidioidomycosis), Coxiella burnetii (the causal agent of Q fever), and Tropheryma whipplei (the causal agent of Whipple disease), are detailed in the Table.
Thus, the agent of Whipple disease was recognized as a bacillus through ultrastructural examination of the bacilli (42).
This approach is based on amplification of the small subunit rRNA gene sequence from infected tissue, as in the method used to identify the culture-resistant bacillus of Whipple disease (7).