Western red cedar


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Western red cedar

An evergreen tree (Thuja plicata) that flourishes in the rainforests of the northwestern U.S. and western Canada. Bark dust shed by the tree is a common source of occupational asthma and rhinitis.
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Correlation of decay condition with extractives content for the western red cedar heartwood stakes in this experiment has also shed new light on the relative importance of the different types of extractives in this species (Morris and Stirling, in press).
The polyoxyphenols of western red cedar (Thuja plicata Donn).
Tropolones extracted from the wood of western red cedar by supercritical carbon dioxide.
For example, the heartwood of species with natural durability, such as redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) or western red cedar (Thuja plicata), will be colonized more slowly than species with thicker, less durable sapwood, such as southern pine (Pinus spp.).
Permissible exposure limits set in early 1989 is for 5 milligrams per cubic meter for all hardwoods and softwoods, except western red cedar. Considered an allergenic species, its limit is 2.5 mg/[m.sup.3].
So far the company has sent these types: 1972, commercial card of unknown wood type; 1973, Douglas fir; 1974, Sitka spruce; 1975, hemlock; 1976, Western red cedar; 1977, red alder; 1978, big leaf maple; 1979, bitter cherry; 1980 Port Orford Western red cedar; 1981, lodge pole pine; 1982, golden chinquapin; 1983, Pacific yew; 1984, Oregon ash; 1985, myrtlewood; 1986, cascara buckthorn; 1987, willow; 1988, tan oak; 1989, Oregon white oak; 1990, Pacific dogwood; 1991, Pacific madrone; 1992, black cottonwood; 1993, ponderosa pine; 1994, grand fir; 1995, California black oak; 1996, Western juniper; 1997, Pacific silver fir; 1998, redwood; 1999, vine maple; 2000, rhododendron; 2001, Pacific bayberry; 2002, KMX pine; 2003, American chestnut; 2004, incense-cedar; 2005, black walnut.
Where results concern shingles, they are stated as such; other references to western red cedar or other species refer to solid sawn lumber siding as in bevel, ship-lap, or other profiles.
Western red cedar intersperses itself between Douglas fir, alder and big leaf maple along the Pacific coast from Northern California to southeastern Alaska.
Western red cedar (Thuja plicata), Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), and red pine (Pinus resinosa) roundwood sections, recovered from freshly processed poles, were individually dried in a series of experimental runs.
Finally, last spring, woodworker and Lorane resident Rich Mitchell began helping the students carve, using a Western red cedar log donated by a neighbor.
Slightly over 47.4 percent of the new home decks were constructed with pressure-treated lumber, followed by western red cedar, concrete, and redwood, representing 18.5, 14.1, and 11.1 percent of the market, respectively.

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