Werther effect

Werther effect

A popular term for an increase in suicide rates that
(1) follow media coverage of suicide(s); or
(2) are inspired by reading about others’ suicides; or
(3) are linked to a friend or family member who committed suicide.

Werther effect

Public health An ↑ suicide rate linked to media coverage of suicide(s), or which occurs in persons 'inspired' by reading about or having had a close relationship with a 'successful' suicide
References in periodicals archive ?
The media has a duty to prevent 'Werther Effect' or copycat suicides, following a widely-publicised suicide.
Another alternative explanation is that this increase is evidence of the Werther effect, which describes the increase in macro-level suicide rates after media reporting of an initial suicide.
(6) This copycat phenomenon is known as the Werther effect and it is most apparent when there is excessive/repetitive reporting of suicide and especially in relation to celebrities.
Reference to this increase in suicide rates after media coverage was termed as the "Werther effect" (7).
One of the best-studied phenomena of suicide is the Werther effect, named after a disappointed lover who takes his own life in Goethe's 18th century novel, "The Sorrows of Young Werther."
Il est important de noter que malgre la recherche considerable faite sur le << Werther effect >>, les etudes sur le << suicide modeling >> n'ont jamais mis en evidence comment l'exposition a un suicide factuel ou des representations fictives du suicide pouvaient causer des comportements suicidaires (Rustad et al., 2003).
They label this the "Werther effect," after Goethe's The Sorrows of Young Werther.
Since the familicides were widely covered in contemporary newspapers (as well as in pamphlets and broadsides), it is certainly possible that the small clusters of cases during the 1780s, 1800s, and 1830s represent early variants of the so-called "Werther effect," noted by modern criminologists, whereby violent deaths increase in the aftermath of highly-publicized suicides or murder-suicides.
3 There is reliable empirical evidence for the existence of a 'Werther effect'; see, among others, David P.
Lastly, the media has a duty to prevent the 'Werther Effect' or copycat suicides, following a widely-publicised suicide.
They include things like financial loss and ruin, emotional or relationship break-ups including divorce, stressful live events, access to means, celebrity or wide media coverage of a recent suicide leading to copy-cat imitations or 'Werther effect' e.t.c.