Werther effect

Werther effect

A popular term for an increase in suicide rates that
(1) follow media coverage of suicide(s); or
(2) are inspired by reading about others’ suicides; or
(3) are linked to a friend or family member who committed suicide.

Werther effect

Public health An ↑ suicide rate linked to media coverage of suicide(s), or which occurs in persons 'inspired' by reading about or having had a close relationship with a 'successful' suicide
References in periodicals archive ?
6) This copycat phenomenon is known as the Werther effect and it is most apparent when there is excessive/repetitive reporting of suicide and especially in relation to celebrities.
Motivation of the presented cases cannot be named as the Werther effect due to some reasons.
One of the best-studied phenomena of suicide is the Werther effect, named after a disappointed lover who takes his own life in Goethe's 18th century novel, "The Sorrows of Young Werther.
Il est important de noter que malgre la recherche considerable faite sur le << Werther effect >>, les etudes sur le << suicide modeling >> n'ont jamais mis en evidence comment l'exposition a un suicide factuel ou des representations fictives du suicide pouvaient causer des comportements suicidaires (Rustad et al.
1974, The influence of suggestion on suicide: substantive and theoretical implications of the Werther effect, American Sociological Review, 39, 3, 340-354.
A Werther effect appears to be a form of voluntary behavioral change produced by interaction with a powerful artifact of popular culture" (10).
25, 1978): 748-50; Phillips, "Motor Vehicle Fatalities Increase Just After Publicized Suicide Stories," Science 196 (June 24, 1977): 1464-65; Phillips, "The Influence of Suggestion on Suicide: Substantive and Theoretical Implications of the Werther Effect," American Sociological Review 39 (June 1974): 340-54.