Wernicke's area


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area

 [a´re-ah] (pl. a´reae, areas) (L.)
a limited space or plane surface.
acoustic a's auditory areas.
association a's areas of the cerebral cortex (excluding primary areas) connected with each other and with the neothalamus; they are responsible for higher mental and emotional processes, including memory, learning, speech, and the interpretation of sensations.
Area. Functional areas and lobes of the cerebrum.
auditory a's two contiguous areas of the temporal lobe in the region of the anterior transverse temporal gyrus, known as the primary and secondary auditory areas. Called also acoustic areas.
Broca's motor speech area an area comprising parts of the opercular and triangular portions of the inferior frontal gyrus; injury to this area may result in motor aphasia.
Broca's parolfactory area a small area of cortex on the medial surface of each cerebral hemisphere, between the anterior and posterior parolfactory sulci. Called also area subcallosa.
Brodmann's a's specific occipital and preoccipital areas of the cerebral cortex, distinguished by differences in the arrangement of their six cellular layers, and identified by numbering each area. They are considered to be the seat of specific functions of the brain.
catchment area
1. the geographical region drained by one body of water.
2. the area whose residents are served by a specialized health care agency. Called also catchment.
contact area proximal surface.
embryonic area (germinal area) (area germinati´va) embryonic disk.
Kiesselbach's area an area on the anterior part of the nasal septum, richly supplied with capillaries, and a common site of epistaxis (nosebleed).
language area any nerve center of the cerebral cortex, usually in the dominant hemisphere, controlling the understanding or use of language.
motor area any area of the cerebral cortex primarily involved in stimulating muscle contractions; most are in the precentral gyri. See also premotor area, sensorimotor area, and Broca's motor speech area.
motor speech area see Broca's motor speech area and Wernicke's area.
occupational performance a's categories of activities that make up an individual's occupational performance; they include activities of daily living, work activities, and play or leisure activities. A delay in any of these areas may be addressed by occupational therapy intervention.
olfactory area
1. a general area of the brain, including the olfactory bulb, tract, and trigone, the anterior portion of the gyrus cinguli, and the uncus.
postcentral area (postrolandic area) an area just posterior to the central sulcus of the cerebral hemisphere that is the primary receiving area for general sensations.
precentral area primary somatomotor area.
premotor area an area of the motor cortex of the frontal lobe immediately in front of the precentral gyrus.
primary area areas of the cerebral cortex comprising the motor and sensory regions.
primary receiving a's the areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the thalamic projections of the primary sensory modalities such as vision, hearing, and smell. Called also sensory areas.
primary somatomotor area an area in the posterior part of the frontal lobe just anterior to the central sulcus; different regions control motor activity of specific parts of the body. Called also precentral area and rolandic area.
projection a's those areas of the cerebral cortex that receive the most direct projection of the sensory systems of the body.
sensorimotor area the cortex of the precentral and postcentral gyri, which are the motor area and the primary receiving area for general sensations, respectively.
sensory a's primary receiving areas.
sensory association area an association area around the borders of a primary receiving area, where sensory stimuli are interpreted.
silent area an area of the brain in which pathologic conditions may occur without producing symptoms.
somatic sensory area (somatosensory area) either of two cortical projection areas in or near the postcentral gyrus where conscious perception of somatic sensations occurs, known as the first or primary somatosensory area and the second or secondary somatosensory area.
area subcallo´sa (subcallosal area) Broca's parolfactory area.
area under the curve (AUC) the area enclosed between the curve of a probability with nonnegative values and the axis of the quality being measured; of the total area under a curve, the proportion that falls between two given points on the curve defines a probability density function.
visual a's three areas (first, second, and third visual areas) of the visual cortex. The first visual area is better known as the striate cortex.
vocal area rima glottidis.
Wernicke's area originally a name for a speech center thought to be confined to the posterior part of the superior temporal gyrus next to the transverse temporal gyri; the term now refers to a wider zone that also includes the supramarginal and angular gyri.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wernicke's area

(vĕr′nĭ-kēz, -kəz)
n.
An area in the posterior left hemisphere of the brain cortex at the sylvian fissure that is important for language comprehension and speech.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Wernicke's area

An area in the dominant hemisphere of the brain that recalls, recognizes, and interprets words and other sounds in the process of using language.
Synonym: Wernicke's center
See also: Wernicke, Carl
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Besides, we have found increased activity in Wernicke's area (BA22) (Table 4) and reduced activity in visual areas, such as BA18 and BA19 (Table 3).
Wernicke's area is located adjacent to the area associated with the reception of auditory stimuli Heschle's gyrus, and Broca's area is located close to the cortical areas assigned to the motor control of the muscles of articulation.
Finally, evidence on lateralized brain activation such as those related to H2 and Wernicke's area must be interpreted with some caution, as the subject examined in the current study was left handed.
But, now, research that analyzed more than 100 imaging studies concludes that Wernicke's area is in the wrong location.
In this type of aphasia, however, the lesion or lesions causing the problem do not directly affect Broca's area but interrupt communication between it and Wernicke's area. Because Broca's area affects speech output (forming words), and Wernicke's area affects input (understanding words), the sufferer can still understand and speak quite well, but putting the two together is nearly impossible.
So, in summary, when a person starts performing a language task, the brain responds by using up energy and producing chemical changes in the language centers of the brain (Broca's and Wernicke's areas, see Figure 3).
Wernicke's area (W) and surrounding areas, including angular gyrus (AG) and supramarginal gyrus (SG), are heteromodal areas that may be responsible for the integration of spoken and written word forms with arbitrary associations that give rise to meaning or semantics (Mesulam, 1998; Pugh et al., 1996).
In humans, a swath of neural tissue, known as Wernicke's area, encompasses the entire planum temporale and helps to orchestrate language comprehension.
Broca's area, related to speech production, and Wernicke's area, associated with comprehending speech, were supposed to be the two centers in the brain associated with verbal communication.
Native English speakers reading English sentences, as opposed to strings of consonants, display heightened activity in three regions of the brain's left hemisphere traditionally associated with language--Broca's area, Wernicke's area, and the angular gyrus--assert Daphne Bavelier of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., and her colleagues.
These regions include the inferior frontal gyrus, or Broca's area, in the front left side of the brain, and the posterior temporal region, commonly referred to as Wernicke's area, toward the back left side of the brain.
Wernicke's area, located in the temporal lobe and also known to perform language functions, displayed comparable responses in both groups.