Weller


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Wel·ler

(wĕl′ər), Thomas Huckle Born 1915.
American microbiologist. He shared a 1954 Nobel Prize for work on the cultivation of the polio virus.
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Weller, 'as 'ud penetrate your benevolent heart, and come out on the other side.
Weller, 'is just a cheap lodgin' house, where the beds is twopence a night.
Weller, 'I'd just have a good night's rest arterwards, and not begin inquiring arter this here deep 'un till the mornin'.
Weller, when he had concluded his report, 'if I can get a talk with this here servant in the mornin', he'll tell me all his master's concerns.
Weller, by his master's permission, retired to spend the evening in his own way; and was shortly afterwards elected, by the unanimous voice of the assembled company, into the taproom chair, in which honourable post he acquitted himself so much to the satisfaction of the gentlemen-frequenters, that their roars of laughter and approbation penetrated to Mr.
Weller was dispelling all the feverish remains of the previous evening's conviviality, through the instrumentality of a halfpenny shower-bath (having induced a young gentleman attached to the stable department, by the offer of that coin, to pump over his head and face, until he was perfectly restored), when he was attracted by the appearance of a young fellow in mulberry-coloured livery, who was sitting on a bench in the yard, reading what appeared to be a hymn-book, with an air of deep abstraction, but who occasionally stole a glance at the individual under the pump, as if he took some interest in his proceedings, nevertheless.
Weller, the first time his eyes encountered the glance of the stranger in the mulberry suit, who had a large, sallow, ugly face, very sunken eyes, and a gigantic head, from which depended a quantity of lank black hair.
Weller, having shovelled and swept away the snow which had fallen on it during the night, Mr.
Weller, the unfortunate skates were firmly screwed and buckled on, and Mr.
Weller, in a very singular and un-swanlike manner, when Mr.
Weller disengaged himself from the grasp of the agonised Pickwickian; and, in so doing, administered a considerable impetus to the unhappy Mr.
Weller, and said in a stern voice, 'Take his skates off.