Wellens syndrome

Wellens syndrome

 [wel´enz]
a group of signs indicating critical proximal stenosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery in patients with unstable angina at a time when there is no pain. It consists of normal or minimally elevated cardiac enzyme levels; little or no elevation of the ST segment; no loss of precordial R waves; and progressive, deep, symmetrical inversion of the T waves, particularly in leads V1 and V2 (though not confined to these leads).
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

Wellens syndrome

(wel′ĕn)
[Hein J.J. Wellens, contemporary Dutch cardiologist]
The electrocardiographic (ECG) signs of impending occlusion of the left main or left anterior descending coronary artery. ECG shows an inverted symmetrical T wave with little or no associated change of the ST segment or R wave. Inversion appears principally in the V leads. The finding identifies patients who are at risk for an extensive myocardial infarction.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Wellens syndrome was first described in the 1980s by de Zwaan, Wellens, et al, who identified specific T-wave changes in precordial leads in 14% to 18% of patients with unstable angina who, subsequently, developed a large anterior wall MI [21].
[23] described the following diagnostic criteria for Wellens syndrome:
Differential diagnosis of Wellens syndrome includes: pulmonary thromboembolism, right bundle branch block, left ventricular hypertrophy, right ventricular hypertrophy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Brugada syndrome and hypokalemia [27].