monosodium glutamate

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monosodium glutamate

 [mon″o-so´de-um]
a salt of glutamic acid, used as a pharmaceutic necessity, and also used to enhance the flavor of foods. See also Chinese restaurant syndrome.

mon·o·so·di·um glu·ta·mate (MSG),

(mon'ō-sō'dē-ŭm glū'tă-māt),
The monosodium salt of the naturally occurring l form of glutamic acid; used as a flavor enhancer that is a cause or contributing factor to colloquially named "Chinese restaurant" syndrome; also used intravenously as an adjunct in treatment of encephalopathies associated with hepatic disease.

MSG

A flavour-enhancing amino acid used in processed, packaged and fast foods, which is an excitatory neurotransmitter and neurotoxin. Other sources with up to 40% MSG include autolysed yeast, calcium caseinate, sodium caseinate, and hydrolysed and texturised proteins.
 
Toxicity
Headaches, heart palpitations, skin flushing, tightness of the chest. MSG may cause convulsions when injected into the peritoneal cavity of experimental animals, stimulating neurons until they die, an effect that has been implicated in brain damage in strokes, hypoglycaemia, trauma, seizures, Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s diseases and Guam-type amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; domoic aoid, a potent glutamate analogue, may cause toxic poisoning in mussel eaters, possibly causing an Alzheimer’s-like disease.

mon·o·so·di·um glu·ta·mate

(MSG) (mon'ō-sō'dē-ŭm glū'tă-māt)
The monosodium salt of the naturally occurring l form of glutamic acid; used as a flavor enhancer that is a cause or contributing factor to colloquially named "Chinese restaurant" syndrome; also used intravenously as an adjunct in treatment of encephalopathies associated with hepatic disease.

monosodium glutamate

The sodium salt of glutamic acid produced by acids or enzyme action on vegetable protein such as wheat gluten or soya bean. Monosodium glutamate is used as a culinary seasoning and flavouring agent and is believed to be responsible for the CHINESE RESTAURANT SYNDROME. Also known as Ajinomoto, Vetsin, Chinese seasoning, Accent or Zest.

mon·o·so·di·um glu·ta·mate

(MSG) (mon'ō-sō'dē-ŭm glū'tă-māt)
Monosodium salt of naturally occurring levorotatory form of glutamic acid; used as a flavor enhancer that is a cause or contributing factor to the colloquially named "Chinese restaurant" syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical trials have demonstrated that Weijing decoction combined with pharmacotherapy can improve symptoms, lung function, and arterial blood gases during AECOPD [9,10].
Included studies were randomized controlled trials (RCT) investigating Weijing decoction for the treatment of acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD).
Studies were excluded if they combined Weijing decoction with other Chinese medicine therapies, such as acupuncture and/or Chinese herbal medicine administered as an injection, or the comparator RP was not a medication recommended by COPD guidelines.
To ensure the largest sample of herbal formulae was included, Weijing decoction was not specifically searched.
Recorded information on study characteristics included first author, publication year, location, setting, study design, population characteristics, sample size, Weijing decoction ingredients, dose, administration, study duration, outcome measures, and adverse events.
Only 15 of these studies used Weijing decoction combined with RP and were included in this review [9,10,1729].
All studies used one packet of Weijing decoction (with modifications) taken twice a day.
Weijing decoction in combination with RP improved FEV1% compared with the same RP (MD 8.78%, 95% CI 7.83 to 9.74, [I.sup.2] = 10%).
Sensitivity analysis after removal of studies at high or unclear risk of bias for random sequence generation showed positive effects of Weijing plus RP compared with RP alone; FEV1 litres (2 studies, MD 0.25L, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.36 [I.sup.2] = 41%); and FEV1% (2 studies, MD 4.02, 95% CI 0.38 to 7.65, [I.sup.2] = 0%) Table 2).
A Beijing court has upheld an administrative decision to bar Yuan Weijing, the wife of prominent blind activist Chen Guangcheng, from leaving China, Human Rights in China said Thursday.
Chen Guangcheng's wife, Yuan Weijing, their six-year-old daughter and his mother are under the watch of up to 100 hired guards, armed with hi-tech surveillance and phone-jamming equipment, who have beaten, threatened or harassed supporters, journalists and even diplomats trying to visit the family.
Chen's wife, Yuan Weijing, added, ''When I heard the news I was very happy because at the very least it means that Chen will get another opportunity to speak on his own behalf.''