Weapons-Grade


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Referring to a substance pure enough for use in a weapon or which has properties making it suitable for weapons use
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"I think that if, as our British colleagues claim, a weapons-grade poison had been used, that person would be dead on the spot.
1, 2016, for every day the department failed to remove one metric ton of weapons-grade defense plutonium.
Today, Iran is not weeks but at least a year away from having enough weapons-grade uranium for one bomb.
He also argued that the policy change would give Washington "return potential", or a chance to recycle the material back into the weapons-grade plutonium.
The Kremlin decree stated that, despite the suspension, Russia's surplus weapons-grade plutonium would not be put to military use.
A Kremlin spokesman said Putin had signed a decree suspending the 2010 agreement under which each side committed to destroy tonnes of weapons-grade material because Washington had not been implementing it and because of current tensions in relations.
Third, Obama's argument assumes that Iran would require 59 pounds of weapons-grade uranium to make an atomic bomb.
"We have to monitor a little longer to see if the new plant actually started producing weapons-grade materials, but it is our assessment that it is in operation," the source said.
In this excerpt from Nuclear Iran, physicist Jeremy Bernstein unpacks what we know about the centrifuges at Natanz to take an informed guess at how likely Iran is to have enough weapons-grade uranium to make a nuclear warhead.
But Kerry very clearly said Iran would not be "months or a year from a nuclear weapon," but rather from having a quantity of weapons-grade uranium sufficient for one nuclear weapon.
SINCE when did the leaking of a football team's starting line-up become a subject for espionage to rival the development of weapons-grade uranium?
TEHRAN - Iran's nuclear chief Ali Akbar Salehi said the unfinished Arak reactor could be modified to produce less plutonium in a bid to reassure the West, local media reported Thursday.The Arak site is of concern to the West because Tehran could theoretically extract weapons-grade plutonium from its spent fuel if it also builds a reprocessing facility, potentially giving it a second route to an atomic bomb."Here we can do some design change ...