Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome


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Related to Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome: meningitis

Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome

 [waht´er-hows frid″er-ik´sen]
the malignant or fulminating form of meningococcal meningitis, which is marked by sudden onset and short course, fever, coma, collapse, cyanosis, hemorrhages from the skin and mucous membranes, and bilateral adrenal hemorrhage.

Wa·ter·house-Frid·er·ich·sen syn·drome

(waw'tĕr-hows frid'ĕr-ik-sĕn),
a condition occurring mainly in children younger than 10 years of age, characterized by vomiting, diarrhea, extensive purpura, cyanosis, tonic-clonic convulsions, and circulatory collapse, usually with meningitis and hemorrhage into the adrenal glands.

Wa·ter·house-Frid·er·ich·sen syn·drome

(waw'tĕr-hows frid'ĕr-ik-sĕn),
a condition occurring mainly in children younger than 10 years of age, characterized by vomiting, diarrhea, extensive purpura, cyanosis, tonic-clonic convulsions, and circulatory collapse, usually with meningitis and hemorrhage into the adrenal glands.

Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome

Infectious disease A clinical crisis characterized by acute adrenal insufficiency, often accompanied by septicemia; WFS is most often caused by N meningitidis, but also H influenzae, S pneumoniae, staphylococci, less commonly, linked to hypoxia during a difficult L&D, acute adrenal insufficiency Epidemiology Most common in hot, dry climates, especially in West Africa Clinical Generalized purpuric rash, shock, hypotension Management Treat underlying infection ASAP

Wa·ter·house-Frid·er·ich·sen syn·drome

(waw'tĕr-hows frē'der-ik-sen sin'drōm)
A condition due to meningococcemia, occurring mainly in children younger than 10 years of age, characterized by vomiting, diarrhea, extensive purpura, cyanosis, tonoclonic convulsions, and circulatory collapse, usually with meningitis and hemorrhage into the suprarenal glands.

Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome

A rare disorder caused by invasion of the blood by meningococcus organisms often in the course of an attack of MENINGITIS. There is bleeding into the ADRENAL GLANDS causing adrenal failure and SHOCK. Enlarging purple spots appear on the skin and there is rapid collapse and coma. Death is inevitable unless effective antibiotic and supportive treatment is quickly given. (Rupert Waterhouse, 1873–1958, English physician; and Carl Friderichsen, b. 1886, Danish paediatrician).

Friderichsen,

Carl, Danish physician, 1886-1982.
Friderichsen syndrome - Synonym(s): Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome
Friderichsen-Waterhouse syndrome - Synonym(s): Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome
Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome - see under Waterhouse

Waterhouse,

Rupert, English physician, 1873-1958.
Friderichsen-Waterhouse syndrome - Synonym(s): Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome
Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome - a condition characterized by vomiting, diarrhea, extensive purpura, cyanosis, tonic-clonic convulsions, and circulatory collapse. Synonym(s): acute fulminating meningococcal septicemia; Friderichsen syndrome; Friderichsen-Waterhouse syndrome

Wa·ter·house-Frid·er·ich·sen syn·drome

(waw'tĕr-hows frē'der-ik-sen sin'drōm)
Condition occurring mainly in children younger than 10 years of age, characterized by vomiting, diarrhea, extensive purpura, cyanosis, tonic-clonic convulsions, and circulatory collapse.
References in periodicals archive ?
Atsumi et al., "Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome caused by invasive Haemophilus influenzae type B infection in a previously healthy young man," Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, vol.
In conclusion, we experienced a rare case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome caused by severe Haemophilus influenzae type B infection in a healthy young man.
However, reports of hemorrhage and shock associated with pneumococcal septicemia in previously healthy children have been limited and have included cases in a previously healthy 13-month-old who developed fatal Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome (5); two children with purpura fulminans (6); and two children with pneumococcal septicemia, shock, and hemorrhagic complications (7).
High dose steroids were carefully tapered off and the patient displayed no signs of Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Eculizumab dosing was continued at her normal dosing interval.