Water-soluble vitamins


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Water-soluble vitamins

Vitamins that are not stored in the body and are easily excreted. They must, therefore, be consumed regularly as foods or supplements to maintain health.

water-soluble vitamins,

n.pl any of a variety of substances essential to human health and function that dissolve in water, such as vitamin C and vitamin B complex. Assist important enzyme activity such as energy production from fats and carbohydrates. If excessive amounts are consumed, they are passed from the body through urine, whereas a deficiency affects growing or rapidly metabolizing tissues such as those in blood, skin, nervous system, and the digestive tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
That means they are more likely to cause toxicity than water-soluble vitamins.
Europe and Asia-Pacific were the top two consumers of feed water-soluble vitamins and minerals in the world, having collectively accounted for more than 61% and 53% of the consumption of feed water-soluble minerals and feed water-soluble vitamins, respectively, in 2012.
Major fluid shifts, diarrhoea, dialysis, diuresis and burn exudates contribute to substantial losses of water-soluble vitamins and trace elements (8).
Conventional nutritional science now recognizes 13 vitamins divided into two categories: four fat-soluble vitamins, and nine water-soluble vitamins (Leskova et al.
This is especially true for the water-soluble vitamins such as Vitamin C and the B vitamins, which are abundant in high-potassium foods such as fruits, vegetables, meat and milk.
Although there isn't an abundance of research, what exists is pretty clear: microwave cooking is one of the best ways to preserve the nutrients in vegetables--probably because you cook them so quickly without boiling the water-soluble vitamins into the cooking water.
Water-soluble vitamins These vitamins can be dissolved in water, and excesses are excreted through urine.
These vitamins can be stored in your fat cells; if they are present in excess, they have a higher risk of toxicity than do water-soluble vitamins.
The single author coverage of the water-soluble vitamins in Part 3 has resulted in identical subheadings for each vitamin, which reinforces basic concepts and allows for an easy grasp of the relevant issues.
The most heat-sensitive nutrients are water-soluble vitamins, like folic acid and vitamins B and C, which are common in vegetables.
The water-soluble vitamins include vitamin C and the B vitamins.