erosion

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Related to Water erosion: Wind erosion, soil erosion, Ice Erosion

erosion

 [e-ro´zhun]
an eating or gnawing away; a shallow or superficial ulceration; in dentistry, the wasting away or loss of substance of a tooth by a chemical process that does not involve known bacterial action. adj., adj ero´sive.
cervical erosion destruction of the squamous epithelium of the vaginal portion of the cervix, due to irritation and later ulceration.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn),
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure. Compare: corrosion.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosa.
3. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion. Synonym(s): odontolysis
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

(ĭ-rō′zhən)
n.
The superficial destruction of a surface by friction, pressure, ulceration, or trauma.

erosive (ĭ-rō′sĭv) adj.

erosion

A wearing away, ulceration. See Apple core erosion, Cervical erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
2. A shallow ulcer; in the stomach and intestine, an ulcer limited to the mucosa, with no penetration of the muscularis mucosae.
3. The wearing away of a tooth by nonbacterial chemical action; when the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]

erosion

the wearing away of geological formations such as rock, soil, etc. For example, deafforestation or the removal of hedges causes soil erosion.

e·ro·sion

(ē-rō'zhŭn)
1. Chemically induced tooth loss, occurring mainly through acid dissolution. When the cause is unknown, it is referred to as idiopathic erosion.
Synonym(s): odontolysis.
2. A wearing away or a state of being worn away, as by friction or pressure.
Compare: corrosion
[L. erosio, fr. erodo, to gnaw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Themes in this category were wind erosion, water erosion and soil compaction.
was used for the total carbonate ([alpha] = -0.3), water erosion ([alpha] = -0.1), and tillage + water erosion ([alpha] = 0.3) data to obtain a normal distribution.
Water erosion rates had a similar range (-99 to +278 t/ha.year) to net erosion rates and made the largest contribution to net erosion, with tillage erosion rates being considerably lower (-36 to +40 t/ha.year).
The energy for water erosion comes from the energy of a falling raindrop or running water.
For example, for $500 million we can enroll a maximum of almost 13.1 million acres, which would acquire 21.5 percent of available water erosion benefits, 69.2 percent of wind erosion benefits, 37.6 percent of groundwater vulnerability benefits, and 16.5 percent of wildlife habitat benefits.
The presence in the subsoil of fragipans with high bulk density and low permeability contributes to a high water erosion hazard, as does poor structural stability under cultivation (Packard and Raeside 1952; Watt 1972).
This pattern of soil redistribution is largely consistent with erosion and deposition patterns resulting from tillage erosion, but does not agree with the 'standard' pattern of water erosion, which shows that water erosion is minimal near the upslope field borders (Covers et al.
The island has suffered from years of water erosion. The work will put mesh and materials around its edge to prevent further slippage into the lake.
The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP), the Geospatial interface for WEPP (GeoWEPP), and the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) are combined in a linkage to estimate the long-term impacts of BMPs on runoff, soil loss, and sediment yields in watershed setting.
But tillage still causes more carbon to be lost by water erosion than no-till does, simply because erosion losses are higher and each particle of soil carries more carbon away.
In many recent applications of the [sup.137]Cs technique it has been used to help derive estimates of the relative rates of tillage and water erosion (e.g.
The effects are many and varied:- land: overpopulation (in 2002 there are 2.2 billion more mouths to feed than in 1972), soil erosion, water erosion (56%), wind erosion (28%), chemical deterioration (12%), agriculture (excessive grazing, deforestation, overexploitation of plant life and industrial activities) and other types of physical or structural damage (4%),- water: half the world rivers are seriously polluted and 67% of the 227 major rivers are seriously or moderately fragmented by basins and other major works that cause irreversible damage to wetlands and other ecosystems, excessive pumping that affects water table contours, salting of soil.

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