animal

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animal

 [an´ĭ-mal]
1. a living organism having sensation and the power of voluntary movement and requiring for its existence oxygen and organic food; animals comprise one of the five kingdoms in the most widely used classification of living organisms.
2. any member of the animal kingdom other than a human being.
3. of or pertaining to such an organism.
control animal an untreated animal otherwise identical in all respects to one that is used for purposes of experiment; used for checking results of treatment.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl),
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

(ăn′ə-məl)
n.
1. Any of numerous multicellular eukaryotic organisms of the kingdom Metazoa (or Animalia) that ingest food rather than manufacturing it themselves and are usually able to move about during at least part of their life cycle. Sponges, jellyfishes, flatworms, mollusks, arthropods, and vertebrates are animals.
2. An animal organism other than a human, especially a mammal.
Drug slang A regionally popular term for LSD
Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action

animal

Pharmacology Any nonhuman animate being endowed with the power of voluntary action. See Cat, Cow, Dog, Fish, Horse, Monkey, Pig, Sentinel animal, Snake. Vox populi Etc.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]

animal

any member of the animal kingdom: organisms that are multicellular and eukaryotic which possess non-photosynthetic, wall-less cells. In some classifications, certain unicellular organisms such as PROTOZOANS are also included.

an·i·mal

(an'i-măl)
1. A living, sentient organism that has membranous cell walls, requires oxygen and organic foods, and is capable of voluntary movement, as distinguished from a plant or mineral.
2. One of the lower animal organisms as distinguished from humans.
[L.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawings painted in two colours with an image of two animals, a land one and a water one, were presented to the subjects with a request to classify (into land and water animals) those which were depicted in red.
1) Images 283 x 283 pixels in size with two overlaid contour drawings representing unambiguous images of land and water animals. The animal drawings were created by means of removing elements creating an ambiguity from polysemantic images in the first experiment.
In water animals, TBS resulted in successful LTP induction, with the first TBS episode resulting in a potentiation of the first and second fPSP peak to 115% and 123% of baseline, respectively (Figure 3; all values reported here are mean values for recordings taken between 31-60 min after TBS delivery).
Watching water animals and birds is easier at the wooden wharves, a new feature of the ponds since spring.
Other water animals like sea horses, turtles, clown fish, shark and many more wonders of sea life will also amaze any visitor.
Dolphins are often thought to be warm water animals but they inhabit all the world's oceans including the Polar regions.
"The majority of the kids have never seen a lot of these cold water animals close up," said Jessica J.
Scientists have also observed snails that hitchhike by sticking to ducks' feet and eggs of tiny brine shrimp and other water animals that survive in bird guts.
Biologists have mused that there might be something funny about the sexual history of bdelloid rotifers, one of the classes of a phylum of little stalk-like water animals crowned with a characteristic circle of hairlike cilia.
But the water mongoose below can swim like an otter and catch crabs and other water animals.
This field is known loosely as "resurrection ecology," in which researchers study the eggs of such creatures as zooplankton - tiny, free-floating water animals - that get buried in lake sediments and can remain viable for decades or even centuries.

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