wash

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wash

 [wosh]
a solution used for cleansing or bathing a part, as an eye or the mouth. See also irrigation and lavage.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

wash

(wahsh),
A solution used to clean or bathe a part. For types of washes, see the specific term, for example, eyewash, mouthwash.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
An acronym for Warfarin-Aspirin Study of Heart Failure
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

wash

(wawsh)
A solution used to clean or bathe a part.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Ninety five percent (95%) believed that washing hands can control infection rates in hospitals.
Officials from the municipality will train schoolchildren in the correct ways of washing hands with soap and water, a key practice in protecting people against infections and food-borne illnesses.
To prevent rushing, suggest washing hands for as long as it takes to sing the "Happy Birthday" song twice.
Healthcare officials also recommend washing hands before entering a hospital, on entry and when leaving individual patient rooms.
Kamal Bin Abdulla, UNICEF representative at the celebration, delivered a speech stressing the importance of washing hands to prevent occurrence of dangerous diseases that may cause death.
"Nobody wants to get ill at Christmas so by following these simple tips, particularly washing hands thoroughly before preparing food and after going to the toilet and handling pets, this can be avoided," she said.
WASHING hands in soap and warm water is the best method to combat the clostridium difficile (C.difficile) super-bug claims a recent Canadian study.
towelettes) may be considered as an alternative to washing hands with nonantimicrobial soap and water.
In fact, you should wash them twice--once in the restroom and again at the workstation/Which of the following activities does NOT require washing hands afterward?
Studies have indicated that simply washing hands can reduce the spread of infections in daycare centers and other settings in industrialized countries, but how much of a difference hygiene could make in poor nations remained unclear.