bipedalism

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bipedalism

a mode of locomotion found in many primates (particularly man) and birds, in which only the hind limbs are used in walking. True bipedalism (i.e. where locomotion is normally bipedal) has required evolutionary changes to the vertebral column and pelvis, with their associated musculature. A principal advantage of bipedalism would seem to be that the forelimbs can become modified for a nonwalking function, e.g. tool handling in man, flight in birds.
References in periodicals archive ?
The explosion in die number of books, journal publications, conference proceedings, and dissertations dealing with services marketing issues during the Walking Erect stage is documented in Table 1.
Along with the rapid growth in journal publications, the number of dissertations in services marketing doubled in the Walking Erect stage when compared to the preceding period.
However, not until the Walking Erect period could a cohesive core of research be identified under these topics.
Three books were published in the Crawling Out stage, eight books in the Scurrying About stage, and fifteen books in the Walking Erect stage.
Several of these services authors have maintained a steady publication flow from the Crawling Out stage through the Walking Erect stage.