sepsis syndrome

(redirected from WBC counts)

sepsis syndrome

clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea and evidence of inadequate organ function or perfusion manifested by at least one of the following: altered mental status, hypoxemia, acidosis, oliguria, or disseminated intravascular coagulation.

sepsis syndrome

clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea and evidence of inadequate organ function or perfusion manifested by at least one of the following: altered mental status, hypoxemia, acidosis, oliguria, or disseminated intravascular coagulation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sepsis syndrome

A constellation of signs, Sx, and systemic responses caused by a wide range of microorganisms that may eventuate into septic shock; SS is a systemic response to infection
Sepsis syndrome, defining parameters  
• Temperature Hypothermia < 35ºC–96ºF or hyperthermia > 39ºC–101ºF
• Tachycardia > 90 beats/minute
• Tachypnea > 20 breaths/minute
• Site of infection Clinically evident focus of infection or positive blood cultures
• Organ dysfunction 1+ end organs with either dysfunction or inadequate perfusion or cerebral dysfunction
• Metabolic derangement Hypoxia–PaO2 < 75 mm Hg, ↑ plasma lactate/unexplained metabolic acidosis
• Fluid imbalance Oliguria–< 30 mL/hr
• WBC counts < 2.0 x 109/L; > 12.0 x 109/L–US: < 2000/mm3; > 12 000/mm3
Note: The confusing semantics of the terms sepsis, sepsis/septic syndrome, and septic shock are unlikely to be resolved in the forseeable future; the terms sepsis and septic syndrome are essentially interchangeable and would in part overlap with septicemia–the early components of a pernicious infectious cascade that has spilled into the circulation; the term septic shock is used when the process becomes virtually irreversible.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sep·sis syn·drome

(sep'sis sin'drōm)
Clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and evidence of inadequate organ function or perfusion manifested by at least one of the following: altered mental status, hypoxemia, acidosis, oliguria, or disseminated intravascular coagulation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sep·sis syn·drome

(sep'sis sin'drōm)
Clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and evidence of inadequate organ function.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Our optimized criteria were the same as those of the consensus group criteria for low hemoglobin values, RDW, high WBC counts, low PLT, eosinophil counts, basophil counts, no or incomplete differential counts, and the presence of suspect flags.
Compared with the 23 infants who had less severe infections, the 8 with more severe infections had significantly higher peak WBC counts (72.8 vs.
(3,4) WBC counts <0.05 X [10.sup.3]/[micro]L and RBC counts <0.01 x [10.sup.6]/[micro]L should be confirmed with an alternative method."
After 6 months, if WBC counts and ANCs have been acceptable (defined as a WBC greater than or equal to 3,500/[mm.sup.3] and an ANC greater than or equal to 2,000/[mm.sup.3]) and have been maintained during the first 6 months of continuous therapy, WBC counts and ANCs can be monitored every 2 weeks for the next 6 months.
Compared with subjects who did not follow the Mediterranean diet, those who adhered most closely to it had 20% lower C-reactive protein levels, 17% lower IL-6 levels, 15% lower homocysteine levels, 14% lower WBC counts, and 6% lower fibrinogen levels.
When white blood cell counts were taken from these children, only 14 (4%) had WBC counts of 15,000/[mm.sup.3]; 13 of these children were given antibiotics.
Generally, good agreement was obtained between RBC and WBC counts by the UF-100 and the counting chamber.
The probability of having a patient suffering from acute appendicitis whose WBC count is >10,000, preop is 97% (PPV), so patients who had raised WBC counts only 40% maybe having acute appendicitis.
A total of 4% (n = 6) of birds had elevated WBC counts (32.4-52.6 x [10.sup.3] cells/[micro]L), and none of the birds had WBC counts that fell below the confidence interval.
The criteria for CAP diagnosis were a typical infiltration change on chest X-ray films within 1 day of symptom occurrence and at least one clinical manifestation, such as cough, yellow and thick sputum, or high fever (>37.8[degrees]C), or at least 2 minor criteria, including tachypnea, dyspnea, pleural pain, chest pain, confusion or disorientation, lung consolidation, or WBC counts > 12000 cells/[micro]L.
Studies from Asia have reported that over half of the cases could be categorised as high-risk, based on age, WBC counts on presentation, presence of CNS disease at diagnosis and male gender.17 In contrast high-risk disease is encountered in only 10% of the cases in developed nations.19-21 In our cohort of patients, almost 40% were in the high-risk group based on age, initial WBC count, CNS/testicular disease and T-ALL phenotype.
The WBC counts ranged from 200/[micro]L to 197400/[micro]L (reference range, 4500-11000/[micro]L).